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Vikings seek trademark for 'Minneapolis Miracle’ nickname

The Minnesota Vikings are the owners of a remarkable victory in last weekend’s NFL divisional playoffs. Now, the team wants to own the nicknames that have been attached to it.

>> Read more trending news/

Stefon Diggs’ stunning 61-yard touchdown catch and run on the final play of the game gave the Vikings a 29-24 victory against New Orleans, giving birth to the nicknames “Minneapolis Miracle” or “Minnesota Miracle.” Monday, the Vikings filed for three trademarks for “Minneapolis Miracle” and one for “Minnesota Miracle,” according to filings published Friday by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

The Vikings want to own the rights to the nickname on more than 100 items, including cell phone straps, football helmets, charge cards, computer game software, DVDs, compact discs and videotapes, according to the filings.

Already, the team is selling a T-shirt with the slogan, “Minneapolis Miracle 1-14-18,” ESPN reported. Diggs began selling shirts licensed by the NFL Players Association with his image and the words “Minneapolis Miracle,” on Wednesday and already has sold more than 1,000 of them online, ESPN reported.

It’s not the first sports nickname that has had a trademark application. For example, former Pittsburgh Steelers running back Franco Harris trademarked the phrase “Franco’s Immaculate Reception,” after his last-second catch-and-run for a touchdown off a deflected pass that gave Pittsburgh a 13-7 victory against Oakland in the 1972 playoffs.

Riles & Co., the corporate entity of former NBA basketball coach Pat Riley, trademarked the phrase “Three-Peat” in 1989.

The Vikings play the Philadelphia Eagles on Sunday in the NFC Championship game.

Paul Bocuse, globe-trotting master of French cuisine, dies

Paul Bocuse, the master chef who defined French cuisine for more than a half-century and put it on tables around the world, has died. He was 91.

Often referred to as the "pope of French cuisine," Bocuse was a tireless pioneer, the first chef to blend the art of cooking with savvy business tactics — branding his cuisine and his image to create an empire of restaurants around the globe.

Bocuse died Saturday at Collonges-au-Mont-d'or, the place where he was born and had his restaurant.

"French gastronomy loses a mythical figure," French President Emmanuel Macron said. "The chefs cry in their kitchens, at the Elysee (presidential palace) and everywhere in France."

Interior Minister Gerard Collomb tweeted that "Mister Paul was France. Simplicity and generosity. Excellence and art de vivre."

Bocuse, who underwent a triple heart bypass in 2005, had also been suffering from Parkinson's disease.

Bocuse's temple to French gastronomy, L'Auberge du Pont de Collonges, outside the city of Lyon in southeastern France, has held three stars — without interruption — since 1965 in the Michelin guide, the bible of gastronomes.

In 1982, Bocuse opened a restaurant in the France Pavilion in Walt Disney World's Epcot Center in Orlando, Florida, headed by his son Jerome, also a chef. In recent years, Bocuse even dabbled in fast food with two outlets in his home base of Lyon.

"He has been a leader. He took the cook out of the kitchen," celebrity French chef Alain Ducasse said at a 2013 gathering to honor Bocuse.

"Monsieur Paul," as he was known, was placed right in the center of 2013 cover of the newsweekly Le Point that exemplified "The French Genius." Shown in his trademark pose — arms folded over his crisp white apron, a tall chef's hat, or "toque," atop his head — he was winged by Marie Curie, Louis Pasteur and Coco Chanel, among other French luminaries.

While excelling in the business of cooking, Bocuse never flagged in his devotion to his first love, creating a top class, quintessentially French meal. He eschewed the fads and experiments that captivated many other top chefs.

"In cooking, there are those who are rap and those who are concerto," he told the French newsmagazine L'Express before his 2005 biography, adding that he tended toward the concerto.

Born into a family of cooks that he dates to the 1700s, Bocuse stood guard over the kitchen of his world-famous restaurant even in retirement. In a 2011 interview with The Associated Press, Bocuse said he slept in the room where he was born above the dining rooms.

"But I changed the sheets," he added with characteristic wry humor.

Born on Feb. 11, 1926, Bocuse entered his first apprenticeship at 16. He worked at the famed La Mere Brazier in Lyon, then spent eight years with one of his culinary idols, Fernand Point, whose cooking was a precursor to France's nouvelle cuisine movement, with lighter sauces and lightly cooked fresh vegetables.

Bocuse's career in the kitchen traversed the ages. He went from apprenticeships and cooking "brigades," as kitchen teams are known, when stoves were coal-fired and chefs also served as scullery maids, to the ultra-modern kitchen of his Auberge.

"There was rigor," Bocuse told the AP. "(At La Mere Brazier) you had to wake up early and milk the cows, feed the pigs, do the laundry and cook .... It was a very tough school of hard knocks."

"Today, the profession has changed enormously. There's no more coal. You push a button and you have heat," he said.

The gastronomic offerings at Bocuse's L'Auberge du Pont de Collonges are rooted in the French culinary tradition: simple, authentic food that was "identifiable" in its nature.

Emblematic of that was a crock of truffle soup topped with a golden bubble of pastry he created in 1975 for then-French President Valery Giscard d'Estaing, which is served to this day. Another classic is fricassee of Bresse chicken — from France's Bresse region, which is famed for its poultry — served in cream with morilles, a spring mushroom.

And his favorite ingredient? Butter.

"(It's a) magical product," he said during a visit to the Culinary Institute of America. "Nothing replaces butter."

Three other cooking must-haves, according to the chef, are fresh produce (his was from his own garden), good, trusted kitchen staff and happy diners.

"It's the client who runs the house," Bocuse said in the AP interview.

While Bocuse's kitchens were meticulously in order, his personal life was on the unorthodox side. He acknowledged in a 2005 biography that he had been quietly sharing his life with three women — simultaneously — each with a pivotal role in his life.

"I think cuisine and sex have lots of common points," Bocuse said before publication of "Paul Bocuse: The Sacred Fire." "Even if it seems a bit macho, I love women."

He is survived by his wife Raymonde, their daughter Francoise and a son, Jerome.

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Sylvie Corbet contributed to this report.

Chicago rapper Fredo Santana dead at 27

Chicago rapper Fredo Santana has died, according to several of his friends, The Chicago Sun-Times reported. He was 27.

Canadian rapper Drake, record producer Maxo Cream and California rapper Lil B expressed their condolences on social media.

Santana, whose birth name was Derrick Coleman, wrote on Instagram in October that he was suffering from liver failure, the Sun-Times reported.

No official cause of death has been listed, MTV reported, although TMZ, citing unnamed family members, reported that Santana died from a seizure at his Los Angeles home late Friday night.

Santana was a force in Chicago’s drill music scene when it began in 2012 He released his 2013 debut album, “Trappin’ Ain’t Dead” on Savage Squad, the record label he founded, MTV reported.

His last album, “Fredo Kruger 2,” was released last year.

In addition to liver troubles, Santana also had kidney failure and seizures, MTV reported.

Mo'Nique urges fans to boycott Netflix for color, gender bias

Award-winning actress and comedian Mo'Nique is urging her fans to boycott Netflix for gender and color bias after she says the entertainment company made her a lowball offer for a comedy special.

>> Read more trending news 

Mo'Nique took to Instagram to air her grievances Friday. In a video, she explained that Netflix offered her $500,000 to do a comedy special, but she rejected the offer. Mo'Nique said she felt it was a low offer considering Amy Schumer, Chris Rock and Dave Chapelle all made millions of dollars for their Netflix comedy specials. According to Mo'Nique, Schumer negotiated with Netflix for $13 million, while Rock and Chapelle each earned $20 million.

Mo'Nique suspects racial and gender bias are at play, since she believes her strong résumé entitles her to more than the $500,000 that Netflix offered.

Paul Stanley Year by Year: 1974-2017 Photographs

We've collected photographs of Kiss star Paul Stanley from every year since his band's debut album came out in 1974.

Continue reading…

Singer Ed Sheeran announces engagement on Instagram

Ed Sheeran has announced his engagement to girlfriend Cherry Seaborn.

The Grammy-winning singer posted a picture of the two on his Instagram page Saturday morning saying the two got engaged right before the new year.

He said they are "very happy and in love" and that their "cats are chuffed as well."

Sheeran said last fall how Seaborn inspired his song "Perfect," which is Number One on the Billboard Hot 100 charts.

Sheeran and Seaborn were friends when the two attended school in Suffolk, England. They reconnected years later.

The Latest: Danish chef behind Noma thanks Bocuse

The Latest on the death of French chef Paul Bocuse at 91 (all times local):

4:50 p.m.

The Danish chef behind one of Europe's most famous restaurants, Noma, has thanked Paul Bocuse for "a lifetime of work and inspiration."

On Twitter, Rene Redzepi wrote Saturday "RIP Paul Bocuse - sleep well chef" about the Frenchman, who embodied French cuisine all over the world.

Redzepi closed Noma last year and plans to reopen an eatery with its own vegetable farm on the edge of Copenhagen's Christiania neighborhood.

The 40-seat Noma — a contraction of the Danish words for Nordic food — opened in 2003. The eatery that sat on Copenhagen's waterfront had two Michelin stars and was voted the world's No. 1 restaurant by Britain's Restaurant Magazine in 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2014.

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4:30 p.m.

The head chef at the Elysee presidential palace says the best way to honor Paul Bocuse is to keep sharing his passion for French gastronomy.

Guillaume Gomez told BFM television that Bocuse created a soup in 1975 at the Elysee, made from truffles, foie gras, chicken, carrots, onions, celeriac and mushrooms, for then-president Valerie Giscard d'Estaing.

Gomez said the soup is still served at the presidential palace under the name of "Elysee soup."

Gomez, who met "Mister Paul" several times, said Bocuse was the first to widely appear in the media so that chefs' work was better recognized.

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3:55 p.m.

The wife and children of master French chef Paul Bocuse want to honor their "captain," who has died at 91.

In a joint statement Saturday, they said that "more than a father and husband, he is a man of heart, a spiritual father, an emblematic figure of world gastronomy and a French flagship who is gone."

The statement is signed by Bocuse's wife Raymonde, their daughter Francoise, and his son Jerome who he had with another companion.

They stress that Bocuse loved life, loved transmitting his knowledge of the kitchen to other chefs and loved the team of chefs that he worked with in his hometown of Collonges-au-Mont-d'Or. The family says "these values will forever continue to inspire us."

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2:55 p.m.

French President Emmanuel Macron has paid tribute to chef Paul Bocuse, the man who embodied French cuisine all over the world.

Macron praised Bocuse's "fidelity" to his village of Collonges-au-Mont-d'Or, near the eastern French city of Lyon, where he was born, created his world-famous restaurant and died Saturday at age 91.

In a statement, Macron underlined Bocuse's "generosity, his respect for traditions as well as his inventiveness." Macron said Bocuse had helped train French and foreign chefs up to his last few days.

The French president says "French gastronomy loses a mythical figure ... The chefs cry in their kitchens, at the Elysee and everywhere in France."

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1:45 p.m.

Paul Bocuse, the master chef who defined French cuisine for nearly half a century and put it on tables around the world, a man who raised the profile of top chefs from invisible kitchen artists to international celebrities, has died at 91.

Often referred to as the "pope of French cuisine," Bocuse was a tireless pioneer, the first chef to blend the art of cooking with savvy business tactics — branding his cuisine and his image to create an empire of restaurants around the globe. His imposing physical stature and his larger-than-life personality matched his bold dreams and his far-flung accomplishments.

Interior Minister Gerard Collomb tweeted Saturday that "Mister Paul was France. Simplicity and generosity. Excellence and art de vivre."

Paul Bocuse, a master of French cuisine, dies at 91

French Interior Minister Gerard Collomb has announced that Paul Bocuse, the world-famous master of French cuisine, has died at the age of 91.

Collomb tweeted Saturday that "Mister Paul was France. Simplicity and generosity. Excellence and art de vivre."

Bocuse held a three-star Michelin rating since 1965 on his restaurant outside the eastern French city of Lyon. He also parlayed his business and cooking skills into a globe-spanning gastronomic empire.

'Schmuck! This Is Your Soundtrack!': The Story of Simon & Garfunkel's 'The Graduate'

Director Mike Nichols used Simon & Garfunkel's music to provide the perfect backdrop to his film, 'The Graduate.'

Continue reading…

Jim Rodford, Argent and Kinks Bassist, Dies

Jim Rodford formed Argent with his cousin, Rod Argent, and later played with the Kinks and the Zombies.

Continue reading…

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