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United Airlines mistakenly flies dog to Japan instead of Kansas City

United Airlines is under fire again after a family said the carrier accidentally sent their dog to Japan instead of Kansas City.

>> RELATED STORY: Dog dies on United Airlines flight after being placed in overhead bin

According to KCTV, Kara Swindle and her family, who are moving from Oregon to Kansas, took a United flight to Kansas City. Their dog, a 10-year-old German shepherd named Irgo, was supposed to be waiting in a United cargo facility when they arrived. 

But that wasn't the case.

When the Swindles went to pick up Irgo, they were greeted by a Great Dane instead, KCTV reported Wednesday. They soon learned that the airline had mixed up the two dogs and mistakenly flew Irgo to Japan, the Great Dane's intended destination.

>> Read more trending news 

In a statement, United told KCTV: "An error occurred during connections in Denver for two pets sent to the wrong destinations. We have notified our customers that their pets have arrived safely and will arrange to return the pets to them as soon as possible. We apologize for this mistake and are following up with the vendor kennel where they were kept overnight to understand what happened."

Irgo will be returned to the Swindles "later this week," KCTV reported.

The news comes the same week another family's dog died on a United flight after a flight attendant reportedly said the pet had to travel in an overhead bin.

Read more here.

65 dead in Iran plane crash, airline says

A commercial aircraft carrying 65 people crashed in Iran on Sunday, killing everyone on board, an airline spokesman told state media. 

>> Read more trending news 

Delta passenger caught on video complaining about baby has been suspended from her job 

The woman accused of screaming at a mother and her baby on a Delta flight last week has now been punished at work.

>> Watch the video here

According to Fox News, Susan Peirez, who claimed to work for New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo during the incident, has been suspended from her job with the New York state government.

>> DOT reveals which airlines ranked highest for complaints in 2017

“State employees are and must be held to the highest standard both professionally and personally,” said Ronni Reich, a spokesperson for the New York State Council of the Arts, where Peirez works. “We were notified of this situation and have commenced an investigation. This employee has been removed from the office and placed on leave until further notice and until the inquiry is resolved.”

>> On Woman kicked off Delta flight for complaining about baby

Mother Marissa Rundell captured the incident on camera, and the video quickly made its rounds on the internet. The footage shows an annoyed Peirez complaining about having to sit next to a “crying baby” on the plane even though it doesn’t appear the child was crying at the time. When a flight attendant informed her that she couldn’t change seats, she threatened to have the employee fired and was soon removed from the flight. 

>> WATCH: United Airlines plane loses engine cover on way to Honolulu, makes emergency landing

Delta responded in a statement, saying Peirez’s actions and behavior failed to meet the airline’s standards for passengers:

>> Read more trending news 

"We ask that customers embrace civility and respect one another when flying Delta," the statement said. "This customer’s behavior toward a fellow customer on a flight from New York to Syracuse was not in keeping with those standards. We appreciate our Endeavor Air flight attendant’s commitment to Delta’s core values and apologize to the other customers on board Flight 4017 who experienced the disturbance."

WATCH: United Airlines plane loses engine cover on way to Honolulu, makes emergency landing

Passengers aboard what one woman called the "scariest flight of my life" are breathing sighs of relief after making a safe landing following a midair engine problem.

>> Watch passenger video from the flight here

According to CNN, United Flight 1175 from San Francisco lost an engine cover over the Pacific Ocean less than an hour before it was set to land in Honolulu.

>> DOT reveals which airlines ranked highest for complaints in 2017

"There was a loud bang ... and then the plane really started shaking," passenger Allison Sudiacal told KHNL. "It was like rattling and the plane was kind of shaking like boom, boom, boom."

Passenger Maria Falaschi tweeted several photos along with the caption, "Scariest flight of my life."

The Boeing 777, which was carrying 363 passengers and 10 crew members, "declared an emergency due to a vibration in the right engine" before safely landing about 40 minutes later in Honolulu, the Federal Aviation Administration said, according to KHON. Emergency personnel were "standing by as a precaution," the Hawaii Department of Transportation said.

>> Read more trending news 

"Our pilots followed all necessary protocols to safely land the aircraft," United said in a statement, according to KHON. "The aircraft taxied to the gate and passengers deplaned normally.”

The FAA said it is investigating the incident.

DOT reveals which airlines ranked highest for complaints in 2017

The U.S. Department of Transportation received 18,148 complaints about air travel in 2017.

It was a year when airline incidents were in the headlines, including a United passenger dragged from a plane and a Delta passenger mauled by an emotional support dog.

>> Read more trending news 

The number of complaints about air travel to the federal government last year — which included complaints about airlines, tour operators and other travel industry companies — was up 1.3 percent from 2016, according to statistics for the year released recently by the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics.

The DOT logged 851 complaints about treatment of disabled passengers in 2017 and 98 complaints about discrimination, according to the department’s air travel consumer report.

>> On PHOTO GALLERY: Air travel complaints by category

Spirit Airlines, an ultra low-cost carrier, had the highest rate of complaints. A total of 11,570 of the complaints were about U.S. airlines, down slightly from 2016, while more than 6,000 complaints in 2017 were about foreign airlines.

Here’s the ranking of U.S. airlines based on the rate of complaints received by the DOT in 2017:

Airline — Complaints per 100,000 passengers boarding planes

  1. Southwest — 0.47
  2. SkyWest — 0.53
  3. Alaska — 0.57
  4. ExpressJet — 0.73
  5. Delta — 0.92
  6. Hawaiian — 0.95
  7. JetBlue — 1.14
  8. United — 1.89
  9. Virgin America — 1.92
  10. American — 1.96
  11. Frontier — 2.78
  12. Spirit — 5.59

Source: U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics

Must-see: Passenger jet skids off runway, gets stuck on edge of cliff

A passenger jet carrying 162 people got stuck on a cliff's edge moments after skidding off a runway early Sunday at Turkey's Trabzon Airport.

According to The Associated Press, no one was hurt in the incident, and everyone on board was evacuated safely. The airport was closed temporarily.

>> Read more trending news 

Authorities said they did not know what caused the incident involving the Pegasus Airlines Boeing 737-800, which was traveling from Ankara to Trabzon, the AP reported.

Dramatic photos from the scene quickly circulated on social media. Take a look at some of them below:

Plane disappears from radar over Gulf of Mexico after taking off from Oklahoma City

A plane that took off from the Wiley Post Airport in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, is missing.

The small aircraft, which can seat five people, was supposed to land in Georgetown, Texas, but radar data shows that it kept going and flew south over the Gulf of Mexico.

>> Read more trending news 

The Coast Guard said it is searching for the last point of contact to confirm whether or not the plane is lost. Officials with NORAD sent four F-16 fighter jets to aid in the search. 

Authorities found the plane, but officials said they could not get the pilot to respond. 

The pilots of the fighter jets said they could only see one person on board -- the pilot. 

Mexican authorities, the US Coast Guard and the State Department are now in charge of the investigation. 

The plane is registered to Abide Aviation LLC out of Edmond, Oklahoma.

The aircraft is a Cirrus SR-22, which is usually equipped with a parachute system that requires someone to pull a lever in the event of an emergency.

Delta flight forced to return to Atlanta airport twice

A Delta flight on its way to London turned around and returned to Atlanta for a second time overnight

>> Delta warns flights may be affected by Southeast winter weather

Delta Flight 284 took off from Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport shortly after 7 p.m. Tuesday. 

Delta told WSB-TV that pilots heard a noise coming from the plane and out of an abundance of caution decided it was in their best interest to turn the plane around. 

>> Bird enters cockpit, forcing airplane’s return to gate

According to, the flight made it just over the North Carolina border when it turned around. 

The plane landed safely shortly before 9:30 p.m. at Hartsfield-Jackson.

A Delta representative said the passengers heading to London would be placed on another flight, which was expected to take off around 11 p.m. Tuesday. That plane took off but then turned around again at about 1:30 a.m. Wednesday.

>> Read more trending news 

The third flight is not scheduled to leave until Wednesday night, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported.

Delta passenger upset after being mistaken for human trafficking victim

A Delta Air Lines passenger is upset after being mistaken for a human trafficking victim.

>> Read more trending news

Lawrenceville, Georgia, resident Stephanie Ung and her friend were returning from a birthday trip in Cancun and coming home to family on Thanksgiving when they were stopped and questioned by officials after the flight arrived in Atlanta. Her brother Henry Ung described the incident in a Facebook post alleging racial discrimination.

Stephanie Ung, a 26-year-old kindergarten teacher in Gwinnett County, said, “They just kept questioning me.”

“I was embarrassed at the airport,” Ung said. “I didn’t do anything wrong. ... This whole experience pretty much has me traumatized.”

>> On Airport training targets human trafficking

Delta said its flight attendants “are trained to look out for signs of possible trafficking.” Amid a campaign to stop human trafficking in Atlanta and beyond, some airline and airport workers have been trained to look out for such signs.

Delta said in a written statement the two women were “observed by another customer to not be in possession of their passports — a possible indicator of a human trafficking event. Delta took the concern seriously and contacted the appropriate authorities who addressed the customers upon landing.”

>> On Hartsfield-Jackson art exhibit focuses on human trafficking

“While their investigation did show that our customers were not being trafficked, we train our crew members to remain alert and use their professional experience and practice best judgment to ensure the safety of customers,” the airline said.

Delta also said: “We do not tolerate discrimination and are troubled by any accusations of discrimination. We have reached out to speak with our customers directly.”

NASA postpones JPSS-1 weather satellite launch

NASA, in partnership with the NOAA, scrubbed Tuesday’s launch of a weather satellite that will help improve weather forecasts due to a last-minute technical problem.

JPSS-1 is the first of a few polar orbiting satellites to launch from the Joint Polar Satellite System.

>> Read more trending news 

The satellites will help improve NOAA forecasts for the three- to seven-day time frame. The data collected from the JPSS is fed into the numerical forecast models to help improve them. The satellites will also collect atmospheric measurements, ground conditions and ocean conditions like vegetation, hurricane intensity, and atmospheric moisture.

The JPSS-1 was scheduled to be launched around 4:47 a.m. EST from Vandenburg Air Force Base in California. The launch has been postponed until Wednesday.

This satellite is a polar orbiting satellite, which means it will orbit the earth from the one pole to the other passing the equator 14 times a day. Full coverage of the planet will be provided then twice a day.

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