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Florida students translate message in bottle from German kindergartners

High school media specialist David Richards was walking on the beach in northeast Florida with his father when they found a bottle in the sand.

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“We were looking at it and we're like, ‘Whoa.’ We saw the cork was still in and the barnacles and we saw the message and said, ‘This is really rad,’” Richards said.

The message was written in German, so he brought it to Ponte Vedra High School's German Club so they could help him translate it.

“It took kind of long because we had to look through to try to read it,” student Sydney Vitti said.

“We were able to make out the name of the kindergarten,” student Jennifer Balestra said.

“It comes from a kindergarten school in Germany, (a) small town (called) Altenkirchen,” Richards said.

German Club sponsor Christina Waugh speaks fluent German and was able to help the students read the message.

“They had read a book about a message in a bottle so they all decided to do it,” Waugh said.

Waugh was able to make contact with the school's leaders in Germany.

“She couldn’t believe someone had found the bottle three and a half years later and it didn’t break in the ocean,” Waugh said.

Shortly after the phone call, the school in Germany sent them pictures and a letter.

“We’re still all so surprised that our bottle was found so far away,” Waugh said.

The students said it’s an experience they’ll always remember.

The students want to keep in contact with the school so they're sending a care package and writing letters to the students there.

Pakistani girl, 7, was raped and killed — and the country seeks #JusticeForZainab

Protesters in the Pakistani city of Kasur took to the streets for the second day Thursday over the rape and murder of 7-year-old Zainab Amin, whose body was uncovered on a pile of garbage this week, days after she was reported missing.

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According to an autopsy report, Zainab was sodomized and strangled to death. Dr. Quratulain Atique, who did the autopsy, told CNN that there were torture marks on her face and her tongue was “crushed between her teeth.”

It’s possible she had been dead for two to three days before she was found in garbage 100 meters from her home Tuesday, Atique said. She was buried Thursday at her ancestral graveyard in Road Kot.

Zainab, whose parents were out of the country on a pilgrimage when their daughter was kidnapped while staying with her aunt on Jan. 4, was the 12th girl to be sexually assaulted and killed in the past two years from the 2-kilometer district in Kasur, Pakistan. The city is about 30 miles from Lahore, the capital of Pakistan’s Punjab province.

Surveillance video given to police by family shows Zainab being led away from the home by a man.

According to Australian news agency ABC, Eman Fatma, 4; Fauzia, 11; Noor Fatma, 7; Ayesha Asif, 5; Laiba, 9; Sana Omar, 7; and Kainat Batool, 8, were among the past victims.

At least five of the murders can be linked to one person, who is the focus of a manhunt involving hundreds of law enforcement officials, police said. At least 90 potential suspects have had their DNA tested.

“For the last two years, we are living in fear, parents are scared to send their kids outside,” Zainab's father Muhammad Amin Ansari told reporters.

Mumtaz Gohar, senior program officer at Pakistani news agency Sahil, told The Express Tribune that in 2017, there were a total of 129 cases of child assault reported from Kasur. Thirty-four were abductions, 23 were rapes, 19 involved sodomy, 17 were attempted rapes, six abduction and rapes, and four abduction and gang rapes.

In 2015, an investigation into the Kasur district uncovered a major child sexual abuse scandal involving up to 25 men who blackmailed children into making sex videos between 2009 and 2014, according to CNN.

Pakistan's National Commission on Human Rights claimed that it published a report into widespread child abuse in Kasur following the 2015 scandal, but its findings were ignored by the district.

“The present incident is an example of the ineptitude of the authorities which have failed to address the issue in an appropriate manner to curb its future recurrence,” the NCHR’s reports stated

Demonstrators flooded the streets Wednesday and Thursday following Zainab’s death this week, many angry that authorities in the Punjab province have done little to keep their kids safe. Residents chanted, “We want the perpetrators brought to justice,” ABC reported.

But the protests quickly turned violent. Some demonstrators set vehicles on fire, destroyed buildings and at least two people died in clashes with police.

On Thursday, the hashtag #JusticeForZainab spread online as Twitter users around the globe expressed outrage and demanded justice. Some shared photos and video of the 7-year-old.

Malala Yousafzai, the youngest person to win the Nobel Peace Prize, also spoke out about the crime.

According to CNN, on Thursday, Punjab's Chief Minister Muhammad Shehbaz Sharif demanded police find and arrest Zainab’s killers in the next 24 hours and offered a $10 million rupee bounty (equivalent to $90,000) to anyone who helps.

Malik Ahmad Khan, a spokesman for the Punjab government, said four people have been caught in connection with the other 11 cases. And DNA test results match six of them, he said.

Early evidence, officials said, suggests the perpetrator was a family acquaintance, The Washington Post reported. But some lawmakers seemed to imply that Zainab's family was partly to blame.

“A child's safety is its parents' responsibility,” Rana Sanaullah, the law minister of Punjab, told the newspaper Dawn.

Canadian woman dies of cancer 2 months after winning $1.5M lottery jackpot

A Canadian woman who won a $1.5 million lottery jackpot while battling stage 4 breast cancer in November has died, according to multiple reports.

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Family members confirmed Diane Bishop’s passing to CBC News on Wednesday. She was 51.

"Diane fought not only for herself, but for those who could not speak for themselves as they dealt with their own financial battles that accompanied their cancer journey," Bishop’s family said in a statement to CBC News. "Diane touched many lives and we know she will be missed greatly. Diane will forever be in our hearts and minds."

CBC News highlighted Bishop’s story one month before her lottery win, as she struggled to make ends meet while undergoing cancer treatment. She was a single mother with two sons in their 20s, the news network reported.

Bishop won the top prize in the Atlantic Lottery’s Set for Life game in November, while she was struggling to cover the costs of her cancer treatment. Lottery officials said her ticket was worth $100,000 per year or a $1.5 million lump sum. Bishop chose the latter.

“This is life-changing,” Bishop said in a Nov. 23 news release from the Atlantic Lottery. “It’s eased my financial strain. Now I can retire and take care of my health.”

She is survived by her sons and her daughter-in-law, according to an online obituary.

Reporter ‘attacked’ by lemurs during report

A reporter apparently never heard the saying about not working with animals or children, but thank goodness he didn’t, because we wouldn’t have the Friday laughs some may need.

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Alexander Dunlop was supposed to do a quick standup about England’s Banham Zoo’s annual counting of the park’s animals. 

But it didn’t go as planned.

A group of lemurs, called a conspiracy, yes really, a conspiracy of lemurs, had a plan to attack Dunlop, ABC News reported.

Brave lemur fans can have a “lemur encounter” and get up close and personal with the wild animals.

Princess Charlotte is learning second language at age of 2

Experts say the best time to learn a second language is when you’re young, and apparently Prince William and Duchess Katherine are following suit, allowing Princess Charlotte to start learning Spanish.

It doesn’t hurt that she’s a member of the royal family and her nanny has been working with the little princess.

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Metro reported that Princess Charlotte has been learning Spanish phrases from nanny Maria Teresa Turrion Borrallo. 

And the 2-year-old isn’t alone in expanding her vocabulary. Prince George is said to be able to count to 10 in Spanish, Metro reported

Princess Charlotte recently started full-time nursery school at Willcocks Nursery School in London, the Associated Press reported.

She turns 3 in May and is fourth in line to the throne, behind Prince Charles, Prince William and Prince George, the AP reported

Prince George started primary school in September at Thomas’s Battersea, Metro reported.

Experts at Cornell have studied the learning of languages and have found that the earlier children learn a second language, the more likely they will be able to speak like a native speaker.

Prince William said Harry has not asked him to be his best man -- yet

Prince Harry’s wedding to Meghan Markle is slightly more than four months away, but the prince has not officially named his best man.

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His older brother, Prince William, would be the logical choice, but Harry has kept quiet about it and William is keeping a respectful distance.

Speaking with United Kingdom radio host Roman Kemp on Wednesday, Prince William said his brother “hasn’t asked me yet, just to clear that up. It could be a sensitive subject.”

William, 35 also said he is “still working” through the conundrum of the wedding and the F.A. Cup soccer final, which both take place May 19.

Former British soccer star Rio Ferdinand asked if the wedding meant that William is likely to miss the big game. William, who normally goes to the final, replied that he was “trying to see what I can do” about the situation. People reported.

>> Prince Harry and Meghan Markle engaged: What to know

According to Town & Country, royal weddings don’t typically have a best man, and instead have “supporters” on either side.

The Duke of Cambridge broke with royal protocol and made Harry his best man for his wedding in 2011, The Express reported.

Federal judge temporarily blocks Trump administration's plan to end DACA

A federal judge in California dealt a blow to the Trump administration’s attempt to end Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals – also known as DACA – on Tuesday by temporarily blocking their ability to do so.

In his ruling, Judge William Alsup said DACA must stay in place until litigation over the program is complete. He also said that the Department of Homeland Security’s “decision to rescind DACA was based on a flawed legal premise.”

The judge’s ruling will allow recipients who didn’t renew by last year’s deadline to submit renewal applications, but no new applications will be allowed to be submitted.

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“Dreamers’ lives were thrown into chaos when the Trump administration tried to terminate the DACA program without obeying the law,” said California Attorney General Xavier Becerra, according to The Hill. “Today’s ruling is a huge step in the right direction.”

“America is and has been home to Dreamers who courageously came forward, applied for DACA and did everything the federal government asked of them,” Becerra continued. “They followed DACA’s rules, they succeeded in school, at work and in business, and they have contributed in building a better America. We will fight at every turn for their rights and opportunities so they may continue to contribute to America.”

The Trump administration announced in September that it was ending the program; however, earlier on Tuesday, during a meeting with Republicans and Democrats to discuss immigration issues, Trump appeared willing to negotiate a pathway to citizenship for millions of undocumented immigrants – a move that stunned both Democrats and Republicans.

“My head is spinning with all the things that were said by the president and others in that room in the course of an hour and a half,” Sen. Richard Durbin, D-Ill., said, according to The New York Times.

During the meeting, Trump also appeared to support Democratic Sen. Diane Feinstein’s call for a clean DACA bill, which would push off dealing with issues like border security until later.

In a tweet Tuesday evening, though, he did seem to harden his resolve on the border wall, saying that a southern border wall must be part of any “DACA approval.”

CDC prepares for nuclear attack

The Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is preparing for the possibility of a nuclear event amid rising tensions between North Korea and the United States.

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President Donald Trump took to Twitter last week to mock North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and his recent message in which the dictator said he had a “button for nuclear weapons on my table” and bragged that the “entire area of the U.S. mainland is within our nuclear strike range.”

According to the New York Times, security experts have noted, “There is no reasonable military option for restraining North Korea that would not involve unacceptable loss of life.”

>> Related: KFC mocks Trump's 'nuclear button' tweet in threat to McDonald's

In response to the growing fear around the possibility of a nuclear event this week, the agency scheduled a “Public Health Response to a Nuclear Detonation” briefing for 1-2 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 16 with government officials to inform the public about what preparations have been made.

From the scheduled announcement:

“While a nuclear detonation is unlikely, it would have devastating results and there would be limited time to take critical protection steps. Despite the fear surrounding such an event, planning and preparation can lessen deaths and illness. For instance, most people don’t realize that sheltering in place for at least 24 hours is crucial to saving lives and reducing exposure to radiation. While federal, state, and local agencies will lead the immediate response efforts, public health will play a key role in responding.

“Join us for this session of Grand Rounds to learn what public health programs have done on a federal, state, and local level to prepare for a nuclear detonation. Learn how planning and preparation efforts for a nuclear detonation are similar and different from other emergency response planning efforts.”

The expert presentation includes:

- Dan Sosin: deputy director, chief medical officer at the CDC’s Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response

- Capt. Michael Noska: radiation safety officer and senior advisor at U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Advisory Team for Environment, Food and Health

- Robert Whitcomb: radiation studies chief at CDC’s division of environmental hazards and health effects and the National Center for Environmental Health

- Betsy Kagey: academic and special projects liaison at Georgia Department of Health’s Office of Emergency Preparedness and Response, division of health protection. 

You must have prior security clearance. U.S. citizens can submit a request to the Grand Rounds Team by emailing grandrounds@cdc.gov. Note that a U.S.-issued photo ID is required. Non-U.S. citizens must submit their requests 20 days prior to the session.

Read more information at CDC.gov

Vodka bottle worth $1.3 million found drained but intact at construction site

A vodka bottle worth $1.3 million -- stolen from a bar in Copenhagen last week -- has been recovered, dented and empty of alcohol but otherwise intact, according to multiple reports.

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Police announced on Twitter that the bottle, stolen from Cafe 33 in Copenhagen on Jan. 2, was found at a construction site north of the city just days after it was stolen.

"I don't know what happened with the vodka, but the bottle was empty," Copenhagen police spokesman Riad Tooba told AFP.

Created by Latvian car manufacturer Dartz Motorz, the Dartz and Russo-Baltique vodka bottle is made of more than 6 pounds each of gold and silver, according to The New York Times. Its cap is diamond-encrusted and shaped to look like a vintage car front. The bottle is also fitted with a leather strap from Dartz’s first Monte Carlo rally car, made in 1912, according to the Times.

The bottle was on loan to Brian Ingberg, owner of Cafe 33, when it was snatched from a locked area by an intruder who was seen in surveillance video. The man can be seen scanning shelves holding some of the 1,200 bottles Ingberg keeps in his collection, according to Denmark’s TV2, before the thief grabs the vodka bottle and runs.

Ingberg posted an image of the bottle on Facebook last week, calling it “the world’s most expensive vodka,” and asking for help identifying the thief.

Police said it was recovered at a construction site in Charlottenlund, a wealthy suburb of Copenhagen.

"I feel fantastic," Ingberg told Denmark's Ekstra Bladet. "The vodka god saved us."

Japanese kayaker banned for 8 years after spiking rival's drink

A Japanese kayaker was hit with an eight-year ban for spiking the drink of a rival so he would fail a drug test, ESPN reported.

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According to the Japan Anti-Doping Agency, Yasuhiro Suzuki spiked the drink of rival Seiji Komatsu with an anabolic steroid at last September’s national championships, causing him to fail a doping test.

The Japan Canoe Federation began investigating after Komatsu tested positive but denied taking drugs. The federation said Komatsu's suspension and records that had been stripped have been restored.

After Komatsu tested positive, Suzuki admitted putting a muscle-building supplement containing the banned steroid methandienone in his drink, ESPN reported. 

It is the first time in Japan that an athlete failed a doping test because of deliberate contamination, JADA said.

Suzuki and Komatsu were considered among the top candidates to represent Japan in the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, ESPN reported.

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