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Las Vegas Shooting

Latest Las Vegas shooting headlines

Reno shooter dead after opening fire from high-rise, police say

A gunman is dead after he opened fire Tuesday from a high-rise in Reno, Nevada, police said.

>> Click here or scroll down for more

>> Read more trending news 

Las Vegas shooting survivor killed in hit-and-run

Roy McClellan was in the crowd during the deadly Las Vegas mass shooting in October, but after surviving the massacre, a hit-and-run accident has taken his life.

McClellan reportedly was hitchhiking on Nov. 17 – a few weeks after gunman Stephen Paddock killed more than 50 people at the Route 91 Harvest festival – when he died, but the details surrounding his death are still unclear.

>> Read the latest on the Las Vegas shootings

McClellan’s wife, Denise, told KSNV: “I’m angry. I’m angry. I feel that [the driver] was under the influence of something or drunk and didn’t want to get caught, so he bailed and left my husband laying there in the street. He doesn’t deserve that.”

McClellan had recalled the Vegas massacre, saying, “It was just ear-piercing. I was like, 'Oh my gosh, what is that noise?' This is horrible.”

His wife said the memories of the shooting were “really messing with his head.” She told KSNV: “This isn’t what I wanted for him. I don’t understand why he wasn’t taken at the shooting, but a month later he was taken this way,” adding, “I hope my husband found peace and he’s safe now.”

>> Read more trending news

This isn’t the first time that a survivor of the Las Vegas shooting has died; in late October, a couple who were in the crowd at the shooting died in a car crash.

Read more here.

 

Couple who survived Las Vegas shooting killed in car crash

A California couple who survived the mass shooting in Las Vegas this month died just two weeks later in a car crash a half-mile from their home.

>> Read more trending news 

Dennis and Lorraine Carver were killed when their vehicle crashed into a metal gate outside their community in Riverside County, California, on Oct. 16 and burst into flames, according to the Las Vegas Review-Journal. The accident was so close to home that their youngest daughter heard the collision.

The Carvers were at the Las Vegas Route 91 Harvest music festival on Oct. 1 when bullets fired by Stephen Paddock from the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay resort rained down on concertgoers. Dennis Carver thought fireworks were going off at first, but once he realized that wasn’t the case, he jumped on top of Lorraine to shield her.

“That’s just the kind of love they had for each other,” Brooke Carver, the couple’s oldest daughter, told the Las Vegas Review-Journal. “Their love was selfless.”

The Carvers escaped the shooting uninjured. They returned to their California home two days after the attack.

“After the shooting, they heard from all of the people they cared about most. They were so happy,” Brooke Carver, 20, said. “The last two weeks of their lives were really just spent living in the moment.”

The couple’s youngest daughter, Madison Carver, 16, heard the crash Oct. 16 and ran down the street. As she rounded the corner, she saw her parents’ car in flames. Dennis, 52, and Lorraine, 53, died together.

Their daughters were grateful that their parents made it out of the massacre alive, they said, and saw amazing glimpses of love from them in the two weeks following the tragedy.

“We were so relieved when they got out of the shooting alive,” Brooke told the Review-Journal. “But I also think we’ve been given little pieces of them that we would’ve never gotten if the shooting hadn’t happened right before they died.”

Mother of slain Las Vegas police officer dies of a broken heart, her family says

The mother of the Las Vegas police officer killed in the mass shooting earlier this month has died after suffering a heart attack hours after his funeral.

>> Watch the news report here

According to the Las Vegas Review-Journal, Sheryl Stiles was in town to lay her son Charleston Hartfield to rest when she had a heart attack while riding an escalator and fell down it, sustaining damaging brain injuries in the process. With most of her family in town for Hartfield’s funeral, they made the tough decision to take her off life support two days later.

>> Read the latest on the Las Vegas shootings 

>> On Rare.us: Off-duty cop killed during Las Vegas shooting left tear-worthy notes for his own funeral

“I was sitting up in the room crying,” her brother Lewis Stiles recalled hearing about the tragic news, according to KVVU. “We came to bury my nephew and then the next thing we know, I have to bury my sister.”

>> On Rare.us: Police officer, Iraq vet, father, football coach: One of the last Las Vegas victims will be laid to rest

Stiles’s family is currently working toward getting her remains back to Louisville, where her family is located, and have set up a GoFundMe page to raise the money to do so. They believe she died of a broken heart.

>> Read more trending news 

“I talked to the chaplain of Metro,” her cousin Cecil Ralston said. “He told me she kept saying, ‘Oh, I want to stay, I want to be with Charleston,’ that she wanted to die.”

 

Las Vegas shooter’s brother arrested, jailed on child porn charges

A brother of Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock was arrested in Los Angeles on suspicion of possessing child pornography, authorities said Wednesday.

>> Read more trending news

The arrest of Bruce Paddock was confirmed by a law enforcement official briefed on the investigation, but not authorized to discuss it publicly.

Paddock is not considered a suspect in the Las Vegas shooting, which left 59 people dead, including the gunman Stephen Paddock.

 

The child porn case predated the Oct. 1 shooting, authorities said. It wasn’t immediately known if he has an attorney.

In addition to the 58 victims in the Las Vegas massacre, hundreds more were wounded on Oct. 1 at the Route 91 Harvest Festival on the Las Vegas Strip. Police said Stephen Paddock opened fire from a window on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino. He was found dead in his hotel room when authorities got there.

>> Related: Campus officer pleads not guilty in traffic stop shooting

Another brother, Eric Paddock, spoke to the media after the shooting, but Bruce Paddock did not.

Mandalay Bay to lock hotel room of Stephen Paddock, Las Vegas shooter, indefinitely

The suite rented by Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock will remain locked indefinitely as hotel employees work to preserve evidence related to the shooting, the New York Post reported.

>> Read more trending news

MGM Resorts International, which owns and operates the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino, announced Thursday that it will not rent the 32nd-floor room following the Oct. 1 massacre that killed 58 people and wounded nearly 500 others attending a country music concert.

“This was a terrible tragedy perpetrated by an evil man,” MGM said in a statement, according to the Las Vegas Sun. “We have no intention of renting that room.”

The company decided to shutter the room indefinitely Thursday as Mandalay Bay officials were ordered to preserve photos, surveillance video and other evidence pertaining to the incident.

>> Read the latest on the Las Vegas shootings

It’s unclear what Mandalay Bay will do with the infamous room once the investigation is completed. The company is said to be cooperating with investigators. It has been asked to hand over all of Paddock’s gambling records there.

Before he went silent, the security guard from the Las Vegas shooting opened up on ‘Ellen’

A security officer who was shot trying to stop Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock at the Mandalay Bay hotel on Oct. 1 appeared in a pre-recorded interview on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” on Wednesday, following reports that he had gone missing.

Jesus Campos told Ellen DeGeneres that he made his way up to the 32nd floor of the hotel as Paddock fired into a crowd of 2,000 concertgoers attending the Route 91 Harvest Festival. When he arrived at the floor, he saw that the doors to the stairwell were locked, which caused him to call the engineering team.

>> Read more trending news 

“I’m walking down [the hallway] and I believe that’s what caught the shooter’s attention,” he said. “As I was walking down I heard rapid fire, and at first I took cover. I felt a burning sensation. I went to go lift my pant leg up, and I saw the blood. That’s when I called it in on my radio, that shots had been fired.”

Paddock reportedly shot Campos through the door of his suite, where hotel engineer Stephen Schuck found him. Schuck also appeared on “Ellen” alongside Campos.

“I saw Jesus, and I started to hear shooting. At the time I didn’t know it was shooting; I thought it was a jackhammer,” Schuck said. “That’s when Jesus, he leaned out, and he said, ‘Take cover! Take cover!’ Yelled at me, and within milliseconds, if he didn’t say that, I would’ve got hit.”

Schuck said that Paddock also started shooting at him through the door and that he felt “pressure” as the bullets passed his head.

RELATED: “RHOC” star’s stepdaughter copes with trauma after surviving the Las Vegas shooting

DeGeneres applauded Campos for being a “hero” and saving so many lives.

“I know that you have had so many people asking you to tell the story, and I know you have had so much reluctance, and you want this to be over,” DeGeneres said. “It’s helpful for people to understand what a hero you are, because you, being shot in the leg, saved so many people’s lives, and instead of you just getting out of there, you saved Stephen’s life and that woman’s life and who knows how many other people.”

Campos stayed behind to help police piece together the incident instead of seeking treatment at the hospital.

Now, Campos told the host that he is “doing better each day. Slowly but surely, just healing physically and mentally.”

Both men politely declined DeGeneres’ usual gift of money, but the host couldn’t let these two heroes walk away empty-handed. Schuck was gifted Colts tickets and VIP treatment to meet the team by the NFL, while Campos was thanked with a gift of season tickets to the Oakland Raiders and a $25,000 donation to the victims of the shooting.

Campos disappeared from the public eye just last week after suddenly canceling interviews on Fox News, CNN, ABC, CBS and NBC.

The company that owns Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino said that Campos “wants to tell his story at a time and place of his choosing.”

“He’s asked that everyone respect his request for privacy,” the company said in a statement. “We could not be more proud of Jesus.”

Woman survives Las Vegas shooting only to have to flee California wildfires

Michella Flores is straightforward about what she’s been through: “Last Sunday, I was running from bullets. This Sunday, I was running from fire.”

On Oct. 1, Flores, a flight attendant who works two jobs, was staying in the Hooters Hotel in Las Vegas between flights. She was there because of a discount they offer to flight crews.

>> Read more trending news

A country music fan, she walked down the street to catch Jason Aldean’s set at the Route 91 Harvest Festival from outside the fence. She saw the set and the worst mass shooting in U.S. history, hiding in the lobby of a casino until the gunfire stopped.

Flores returned to the home of her parents in Santa Rosa, California, Flores works at the Santa Rosa airport as well, according to KTVU, and was staying with her parents, as she’s in the process of moving.

The glow of one of the California wildfires grew closer to her parents’ home. Flores knew about the fires — Cal Fire crews had been coming and going from the Santa Rosa airport — but she wasn’t sure how close they were to her parents’ home — until the flames pulled up to her parents’ driveway.

Flores, a former firefighter herself, helped firefighters battle the flames with a garden hose. She had to leave for a shift at the Oakland airport at 4 a.m. the next day. By the end of her shift, her parents’ home had burned to the ground.

“Almost everything I own is gone,” she says. “My bed, my bike, my clothes, my flight attendant uniforms.”

Though they escaped unharmed, her parents lost belongings too. They are living in the rental home Flores was preparing to move into, according to the Daily Mail.

The Flores family has set up a GoFundMe to raise money to rebuild family members’ lives.

  Texas inmates donate $53,000 for Harvey relief efforts
  California inmates paid $1 an hour to battle wildfires

Las Vegas shooting victim awakens from coma, takes first steps

A 27-year-old Maryland native who was shot in the eye during the Oct. 1 mass shooting in Las Vegas is showing promising signs of improvement, doctors and family said this week.Tina Frost was shot in the right eye by Stephen Paddock while fleeing the Route 91 country music festival with a group of friends. Frost had been in a coma for over a week, WBAL reported.

>> Read more trending news

An update posted Friday on the family's GoFundMe page celebrated the good news in her recovery: Frost has emerged from her coma and has taken a few steps with assistance. Frost's family says she has been able to breathe for awhile without assistance.Dr. Keith Blum, who treated Frost, told The Las Vegas Review-Journal that there's a 90 percent mortality rate for people shot in the head. Frost underwent a very delicate, three-hour surgery, and some bullet fragments remain in her brain. While Frost lost her right eye and has a long road of recovery ahead of her, she continues to amaze her doctors and family, according to the family’s GoFundMe page.

Zappos offers to pay for funeral costs of  Las Vegas victims

James Leynse/Corbis via Getty Images

Zappos offers to pay for funeral costs of Las Vegas victims

Online retailer Zappos, headquartered in Las Vegas, has offered to pay funeral costs of victims shot and killed by gunman Stephen Paddock this month at the Route 91 Harvest music festival, the Las Vegas Review-Journal reported.

>> Read more trending news

In the wake of the Oct. 1 shooting, Zappos asked for donations for victims and their families and pledged to match donations up to $1 million.

The company, which is using crowdfunding site Crowdrise, had raised more than $350,000 by Friday morning. More than 2,800 donations have come from local businesses, organizations and individuals. The account description noted that 100 percent of funds raised will go toward helping support victims and their families.

According to the Las Vegas Sun, Zappos has already used company funds -- not funds raised through the fundraiser -- to cover funeral costs for three victims. Families of each of the victims received $20,000 each to pay for funeral- and transportation-related costs, Steven Bautista, who oversees the Zappos for Good program and volunteer initiatives at the company, told the Sun. 

“We have been connected with a few families that had funeral costs that they were not able to afford,” said Bautista. “We’ve been pulling money from the money that is outstanding, to be able to pay for the immediate needs that they may have. We don’t want them to have to skimp on funerals.”

Bautista said the company has helped pay to ship victims’ bodies across states to funeral homes. He asked that families of any of the Vegas victims who may need help with funeral-related costs reach out to zapposforgood@zappos.com.

Zappos, founded in 1999, moved its headquarters from Henderson, Nevada, to Las Vegas in 2013. 

Zappos is a subsidiary of Amazon.

>> Las Vegas shooting: Remembering the victims

>> Read the latest on the Las Vegas shootings

Read more at the Las Vegas Sun.

Woman shot in Las Vegas massacre sues bump stock maker, hotel, festival organizer

A California college student filed suit Tuesday against the manufacturer of devices that enabled a gunman to rapidly rain bullets on a crowd gathered for a country music festival in Las Vegas earlier this month after she was seriously injured in the deadly attack.

>> Read more trending news

Also named in the suit were MGM Resorts International, Mandalay Corp., Live Nation Entertainment Inc. and the estate of Stephen Paddock, the man who turned a gun on himself after killing 58 people and injuring hundreds more in the Oct. 1 attack. 

Las Vegas police said Paddock, 64, opened fire on the Route 91 Harvest music festival from his hotel room on the 32nd floor of the nearby Mandalay Bay Hotel.

Investigators said they found 12 rifles in his room that were fitted with bump stocks, devices that allow semi-automatic weapons to fire at nearly the rate of automatic guns.

>> Read the latest on the Las Vegas shootings

Paige Gasper, 21, was wounded in Paddock’s attack. A bullet hit her in her right underarm and traveled through her chest, shattering her ribs and lacerating her liver, according to the suit filed Tuesday in Clark County District Court. Friends tried to help her, but were hampered by other fleeing concert-goers, who trampled Gasper in their haste. She was saved by a good Samaritan, who pulled her behind the cover of a dumpster, the suit said. Another stranger drove her to Spring Valley Hospital for treatment.

>> Related: Las Vegas shooting: Remembering the victims

On Tuesday, Gasper sued Slide Fire Solutions, the company that made the bump stocks used by Paddock, on accusations that the company was negligent and its products have design and manufacturing defects, Reuters reported.

Gasper accused MGM Resorts and Mandalay Corp., its subsidiary, of failing to quickly respond to the shooting of Mandalay Bay security officer Jesus Campos, who police said was shot while checking on Paddock six minutes before the 64-year-old commenced his attack. She also accused the companies of failing to monitor Paddock, who brought multiple weapons to the hotel and set up surveillance cameras outside his room.

>> Related: Casino mogul Steve Wynn says Las Vegas shooter would have triggered alarms at his hotels 

“How did the hotel not know about that? Why wasn’t that a red flag?” Michelle Tuegel, an attorney representing Gasper, asked the Las Vegas Review-Journal. “The company can talk about hearts and prayers, but this lawsuit is about action and answers. Paige wants answers.”

Gasper said in her lawsuit that Live Nation, the organizer of the Route 91 Harvest music festival, and MGM failed to provide visitors with adequate emergency exits, hampering efforts to escape the massacre.

In a statement released to the Review-Journal, MGM spokeswoman Debra DeShong called the Oct. 1 shooting a “meticulously planned, evil, senseless act.”

>>Related: Police: Stephen Paddock shot security guard before firing on Las Vegas concert

“As our company and city work through the healing process, our primary focus and concern is taking actions to support the victims and their families, our guests and employees and cooperating with law enforcement,” DeShong said. “Out of respect for the victims, we are not going to try this case in the public domain and we will give our response through the appropriate legal channels.”

Victor Schwartz, an attorney who specializes in injury cases, told Reuters that it won’t be easy to hold MGM liable for Paddocks’ attack.

“Victims would have to show the company could have foreseen the shooting and take steps to prevent it,” Reuters reported. “That would be difficult for such an extreme event.”

 

Las Vegas shooter's brain reveals no clues

Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock reportedly does not appear to have the brain abnormalities that police expected to find, according to an examination by doctors who have begun his autopsy.

>> Las Vegas shooter's longtime friend says he was a man who 'cared about everybody'

The Las Vegas Review-Journal spoke to Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo, a familiar face to those who watched the news immediately after the shooting and beyond, and the sheriff said preliminary examination of Paddock’s brain did not yield any abnormalities.

>> Read the latest on the Las Vegas shootings

“All those things that you would expect to find, we have not found,” he said.

>> On Rare.us: Father of Las Vegas shooter was a “minister” — of a criminal nature

The shooter’s brother, Eric Paddock, said he never saw any of this coming and believed that the “only thing possible” was that "something broke in his [brother’s] head," The Washington Post reported.

“I’m hoping they cut open his brain and find something. There’s a data point missing,” Eric Paddock said after finding out that his brother had murdered 58 people and wounded hundreds more.

>> Read more trending news

That data point is still missing, but the Review-Journal did note two other important things: Authorities don’t yet know the toxicology results, and Dr. Steven Winkler reportedly prescribed Paddock an anti-anxiety drug as recently as June.

 

Las Vegas shooter's longtime friend says he was a man who 'cared about everybody'

A friend and longtime employee of Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock said the 64-year-old “cared about everybody” and tried his best to “make people happy,” the Daily Mail reports.

>> Watch the news report here

Lisa Crawford, of Dallas, Texas, who managed an apartment that Paddock owned from 2006 to 2012, spoke to ABC News’ “Good Morning America,” fighting back tears as she tried reconcile the man she knew with the one who killed 58 people and wounded nearly 500 more when he opened fire on concertgoers from the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay hotel.

>> Read the latest on the Las Vegas shootings

“He tried to make people happy. He tried to make people care. And I don’t know what happened to him,” Crawford said.

>> Read more trending news

She said Paddock, who apparently committed suicide before law enforcement reached his room, was a humorous person and generous with his tenants.

Crawford said she last spoke to Paddock a few weeks ago via email, when he checked in on her during Hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

>> On Rare.us: A veteran and hero of the Las Vegas shooting just made us proud all over again

“I have read them over and over and over again,” Crawford said of her correspondence with him. “I’ve even looked at some photos online of, I guess, him and his girlfriend. You know, I was even trying to look into his eyes to see if I saw something that wasn’t normal, you know. No, I didn’t see anything.”

 

Victims collect items left behind after Las Vegas massacre

It has been more than a week since a gunman opened fire at the Route 91 Harvest Festival and victims and their families are now able to collect the items that were left behind when people ran for their lives.

The shooting claimed the lives of 58 people and injured about 500. 

And as concertgoers tried to run as shots rang out, they left behind nearly everything. 

Now those items are able to be returned to those who left them, or the family members of those who lost their lives.

>> Read more trending news 

The area where thousands of items like lawn chairs, purses and cellphones were left is being protected from the media to allow those who are trying to claim their possessions to do so in private, KVVU reported.

The effort to return property comes after FBI investigators dug through the crime scene, sorting evidence from the items and transporting them to a convention center, The Associated Press reported.

>> Read the latest on the Las Vegas shootings 

People are able to get in to retrieve the items, based on where they were seated before the shooting, specifically the area west of the stage, the handicapped accessible area and inside and in front of the VIP tent. The bleacher seating to the east of the stage is also included, The AP reported.

Being reunited with the items had some victims smiling, while others cried remembering that night, some taking a moment to hug the FBI agents and Red Cross volunteers who are there, The AP reported.

Related video: What You Need to Know: Stephen Paddock, Las Vegas Shooter:

 

Casino mogul Steve Wynn says Las Vegas shooter would have triggered alarms at his hotels

Casino mogul Steve Wynn identified Las Vegas as a target city nearly two years ago, and he told Fox News anchor Chris Wallace on Sunday that he increased spending on security at his hotels by “tens of millions of dollars” in attempt to “identify and pre-empt any kind of terroristic or violent threat.”

>> Watch the interview here

Wynn suggested that the training and steps implemented at his properties would have set off alarm bells if Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock had tried to launch his mass murder scheme from one of them.

>> Read the latest on the Las Vegas shootings

Specific training techniques include Wynn hotels housekeeping staffs, room service staffs and anybody else who enters a guest room doing visual inspections every time. He added that a room with a “Do Not Disturb” sign displayed on its door for longer than 12 hours is investigated.

“The scenario that we’re aware of would have indicated that [Paddock] didn’t let anyone in the room for two or three days,” Wynn told “Fox News Sunday.” “That would have triggered a whole bunch of alarms here.”

>> On Rare.us: Somber photos of Las Vegas emerge after the city cut its lights for 11 minutes

Wynn said guns are not allowed in his hotels, unless they belong to employees who are required to carry them. He said guests who are found to have guns, “we eject from the hotel.” Wynn said they discover guests with guns “continually.”

>> Read more trending news

After the shooting, Wynn hotels started using wands to detect potential metal objects on guests, as well as inspecting luggage upon entrance to the hotel.

>> On Rare.us: The father of Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock was a “minister” — of a criminal nature

Paddock had been known to stay at Wynn resorts, among many others. Wallace asked Wynn if his security teams had much of a profile on him, and if anything should have raised a red flag.

“The most vanilla profile one could possibly imagine. A modest gambler, at least by our standards,” Wynn said.

 

Police: Stephen Paddock shot security guard before firing on Las Vegas concert

In a bombshell adjustment to the official timeline, police said Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock fired on security guard Jesus Campos before taking aim at the concert crowd.

Related: Las Vegas shooting coverage

The Los Angeles Times reported Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo said in a news conference Monday that Paddock shot Campos  before gunning down Route 91 Harvest country music festival attendees.

>> Read more trending news

Previously, officials credited Campos with stopping the assault.

Related: Las Vegas shooting: Remembering the victims

According to officials, Campos distracted the gunman from continuing to shoot victims when he was checking on an open door alert for another room. Paddock, 64, was on the 32nd floor off the Mandalay Bay hotel when he began the shooting.

Related: Who is Stephen Paddock, the shooter killed in Las Vegas?

Officials say they don’t know why the attack stopped. Lombardo said police didn’t know Campos was shot “until they met him in the hallway after exiting the elevator.”

WATCH: Las Vegas police officers describe storming gunman's hotel room

After releasing a preview the day before, CBS's “60 Minutes” on Sunday night showed the full interview with law enforcement officers who stormed the Las Vegas hotel room where gunman Stephen Paddock launched his brutal assault.

>> Watch the full interview here

>> On Rare.us: Law enforcement reveals the meaning behind the cryptic note left by the Las Vegas shooter

“60 Minutes” opened the segment “Storming Room 135” with Detectives Casey Clarkson and Matthew Donaldson, Officers Joshua Bitsko and Dave Newton and SWAT team member Levi Hancock describing the “neatly stacked” guns and magazines in the hotel room at the Mandalay Bay that Paddock used to kill 58 people and wound hundreds more.

>> Read the latest on the Las Vegas shootings

The officers said there were so many long guns in the room that they were tripping over them. Each of them heard over the police radio that there was an active shooter and responded to the scene without hesitation. Conflicting reports over the radio of whether the shooter was on the 29th floor or 32nd floor made the officers think there may have been two shooters.

They soon learned that wasn’t the case.

>> Jason Aldean opens 'SNL,' pays tribute to Las Vegas victims, Tom Petty

The officers formed an ad hoc SWAT unit, carefully planning the breach of Paddock’s room.

A food tray on a room service cart just outside the door thought to be a booby trap actually turned out to be cameras Paddock set up to warn himself of law enforcement activity.

After officers breached the room, they said it looked “almost like a gun store," adding that they saw a bloody revolver on the floor that Paddock used to take his own life.

Between laptops, phones, drills, drill bits, tools, electrical wiring and a note with numbers signifying altitude, distance from the crowd and bullet drop, the room painted one clear picture, the officers said: Paddock had planned this for some time.

>> On Rare.us: Trump highlights doctors and police in video after Las Vegas

Contrary to reports that Paddock may have planned to escape, the officers said it appeared he may have planned to have a shootout with police.

“The sheriff was saying the other day that it almost appeared as though he thought he would be able to get out of this, that he had an escape plan. Did you see any evidence of that?” CBS’s Bill Whitaker asked.

>> Read more trending news

“From what I saw ... his plan might have been to shoot it out with us,” Newton replied. “Because there was a rifle on a bipod near the door and just the amount of ammunition and weapons he had. He could of held us off for hours.”

You can read the full transcript of the interview here.

 

Veteran who helped Las Vegas shooting victims to receive free truck

A car dealership is offering a free truck to the Marine veteran who commandeered a truck and loaded it with dozens of victims and took them to hospitals during the mass shooting in Las Vegas.

>> Read more trending news

Taylor Winston, 29, found keys to a utility truck and he and others started loading the injured into the truck, making two trips to deliver 30 people to different area hospitals.

Shane Beus, owner of a car dealership in Gilbert, Arizona, read about Winston’s actions and reached out to the veteran who lives in San Diego, according to the Arizona Republic.

Winston is expected to pick up the silver F-150 Monday.

Winston said he will sell his current vehicle and donate the money to victims of the shooting.

  Veteran commandeers truck to save injured during Las Vegas shooting

Las Vegas shooter's note had calculations for targeting crowd, police say

CNN and other news outlets are now reporting that the cryptic note left behind by Las Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock said to contain a puzzling series of numbers is now believed to be calculations of distance and trajectory from the 32nd-floor windows of the Mandalay Bay Hotel, which he used as a perch to fire on a crowd of thousands, kill 58 and wound hundreds.

>> On Rare.us: Police make discovery about the woman last seen with Las Vegas shooter

CBS News’s “60 Minutes” also obtained the information from officers who were on the scene first. 

>> Read the latest on the Las Vegas shootings

Officer Dave Newton of the Las Vegas Police Department’s K-9 unit said he “could see on it he had written the distance, the elevation he was on, the drop of what his bullet was gonna be for the crowd.”

>> Jason Aldean opens 'SNL,' pays tribute to Las Vegas victims, Tom Petty

“So he had that written down and figured out so he would know where to shoot to hit his targets from there,” Newton added.

Newton also described what it was like after they breached the door of the hotel room and found Paddock dead from a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

“Very eerie. Yeah, the dust from the explosive breach. And, then you have the flashing lights,” he said. “And that looked straight, like, out of a movie, you know?”

Las Vegas Sheriff Joseph Lombardo has said his officers and the FBI are currently following up on all leads.

>> Read more trending news

“There’s people that know this individual. There’s people that can help us understand this individual,” Lombardo has said, according to KABC.

Vice President Mike Pence visited Las Vegas on Saturday to take part in a ceremony honoring the victims of last weekend’s massacre.

>> Watch the clip here

 

Jason Aldean opens 'SNL,' pays tribute to Las Vegas victims, Tom Petty

Jason Aldean and his band have kept a low profile in the aftermath of the Oct. 1 shooting during his headline set at the Route 91 Harvest Festival in Las Vegas that claimed the lives of 58 fans and injured more than 500 others. But on Oct. 7, they made a surprise appearance on NBC’s “Saturday Night Live,” opening the show with a performance of Tom Petty’s “I Won’t Back Down.” Petty died as a result of a heart attack the day after the festival shooting.

>> On AJC.com: WATCH: Jason Aldean opens ‘Saturday Night Live’ with tribute to Las Vegas victims, Tom Petty

>> Watch the clip here

>> Read the latest on the Las Vegas shootings

“This week we witnessed one of the worst tragedies in American history,” a somber Aldean said at the top of the show. “Like everyone, I’m struggling to understand what happened that night, and how to pick up the pieces and start to heal. So may people are hurting. There are children, parents, brothers, sisters, friends, they’re all part of our family. So I want to say to them, we hurt for you, and we hurt with you. But you can be sure that we’re going to walk through these tough times together, every step of the way. Because when America is at its best, our bond and our spirit, it’s unbreakable.”

>> PHOTOS: Tom Petty through the years

>> On Rare.us: Jason Aldean’s guitarist speaks out for first time after Vegas massacre

Aldean had been scheduled to play shows in Los Angeles, San Diego and Anaheim, California, this weekend, but he canceled those gigs on Tuesday, explaining in a prepared statement that he did so “out of respect for the victims, their families and our fans.” In the same statement, he said, “Our first time back onstage will be a very tough and emotional thing for us, but we will all get through it together and honor the people we lost by doing the only thing we know how to do — play our songs for them.”

>> Read more trending news

>> On Rare.us: Jason Aldean cancels shows in wake of Las Vegas shooting

The “SNL” appearance marked the first time back onstage. Aldean's “They Don’t Know Tour” is scheduled to resume Oct. 12 in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

 
Rifle bump stocks in high demand after use in Las Vegas massacre, gun stores say

WFTV.com

Rifle bump stocks in high demand after use in Las Vegas massacre, gun stores say

While many people may not have known what a bump stock was before Sunday, the device used by a gunman in Las Vegas has gained national attention.

A bump stock is a device that can be attached to a semi-automatic rifle and, in essence, allow it to be fired at speeds approaching a fully automatic machine gun.

With the bump stock’s new notoriety – 12 of the devices were found after the Las Vegas attack that killed 58 and injured hundreds – Central Florida gun store owners say they have become a high-demand item.

>>What is a bump stock, how does it work and is it legal?

Jeremy Sternisha, with The Armories Gun Shop in Oviedo, said bump stocks have not been a popular item in the past.

“We haven’t sold one in the two years that we’ve been open,” he said.

Now the interest has skyrocketed, and gun shop owners and managers believe the fear of new regulations is to blame.

>> Read more trending news

“We’ve definitely seen an increase in phone calls of people asking if we have bump stocks or asking how they work, or what the deal is,” Sternisha said.

The National Rifle Association released a statement Thursday afternoon saying that the status of bump stocks needs to be examined.

“The NRA believes that devices designed to allow semi-automatic rifles to function like fully automatic rifles should be subject to additional regulations,” the statement said.

>>NRA calls for regulation of 'bump stocks' after Las Vegas massacre

Bump stock makers Slide Fire Solutions and Bump Fire Systems have stopped taking orders for the devices due to an “extremely high demand.”

Getting them now is next to impossible, Sternisha said.

“Our distributors are out of stock, so even if we wanted to order them, we couldn’t,” he said.

NRA calls for regulation of 'bump stocks' after Las Vegas massacre

The National Rifle Association is calling for federal officials to review regulations that allow people to buy devices which can make semi-automatic guns fire at a rate similar to automatic weapons in the wake of a mass shooting that left nearly 60 people dead and hundreds injured.

>> Read more trending news

Authorities told The Associated Press that they found a dozen of the devices, known as bump stocks, on weapons used Sunday by Stephen Paddock to fire hundreds of bullets at people gathered in Las Vegas for the Route 91 Harvest music festival.

In a statement released Thursday, NRA officials said that the group “believes that devices designed to allow semi-automatic rifles to function like fully-automatic rifles should be subject to additional regulations.”

The lobbying group also reiterated its commitment to fight against gun regulation.

“The first response from some politicians has been to call for more gun control,” officials said. “Banning guns from law-abiding Americans based on the criminal act of a madman will do nothing to prevent future attacks.”

The statement was issued as lawmakers consider the possibility of banning the devices.

>> Related: What is a bump stock, how does it work and is it legal?

"If somebody can essentially convert a semi-automatic weapon by buying one of these and utilizing it and cause the kind of mayhem and mass casualties that we saw in Las Vegas, that's something of obvious concern that we ought to explore,” the No. 2 Senate Republican, John Cornyn of Texas, said on Thursday. "I own a lot of guns and as a hunter and sportsman I think that's our right as Americans, but I don't understand the use of this bump stock and that's another reason to have a hearing."

White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said at a news briefing on Thursday that the administration would be “very open” to discussing the possibility of banning bump stocks.

“We welcome, certainly, that and conversation on that,” she said.

President Donald Trump visited Las Vegas on Wednesday but said "We're not going to talk about that today" when asked about gun issues.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

 

Reports: Las Vegas shooter may have researched Boston locations

The Las Vegas shooter who killed nearly 60 people and wounded more than 500 at a concert Sunday reportedly researched locations in Boston.

>> Read more trending news 

According to The Associated Press, in August, 64-year-old Stephen Paddock booked a room at Chicago's Blackstone Hotel, which overlooked where the Lollapalooza music festival was being held that weekend. Officials say there was no evidence Paddock ever went to Chicago that weekend. 

>> Related: Las Vegas shooter booked rooms near Lollapalooza: Reports

Now, officials are looking into reports that Paddock also researched locations in Boston.

The Boston Police Department released the following statement:

"We are aware of the media reports referencing a Boston connection to the Las Vegas mass shooting incident that occurred on Sunday, October 1, 2017. The Boston Regional Intelligence Center is in contact with our local and federal law enforcement partners here and in Las Vegas and continues to monitor the situation. There is currently no known threat to the Metro Boston Homeland Security Region related to this incident. The LVMPD is the lead investigating agency, therefore, all further inquires should be directed to them. The BPD has and will continue to take proper security measures to protect all public venues and gatherings in the city."

Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker spoke Thursday, saying, "There is no evidence of an imminent threat that has anything to do with Massachusetts." 

According to NBC News, which cited an unnamed law enforcement official, Paddock researched hotels near Fenway Park in Boston. Boston police did not confirm.

The spokesperson for the Boston Red Sox said they are stepping up security as a precaution:

"We are aware of the media reports. The FBI has requested all inquiries be referred directly to them. While there is currently no credible threat to Fenway Park, according to public safety agencies, the Red Sox have been working with city, state and federal officials on increased security measures for postseason games at Fenway Park."

There is no word on if Paddock ever actually visited Boston. 

>> Boston 25 News obtains exclusive photos of Las Vegas shooter's guns

>> Mass. lawmaker proposing ban on bump stocks in wake of Las Vegas massacre

Check for updates to this story at Boston25News.com.  

Brianna Chambers contributed to this report.

Las Vegas shooter had plans to escape after massacre, may have had accomplice, sheriff says

The shooter in the massacre at a Las Vegas music festival Sunday night planned to escape from the hotel room where he carried out the attack and may have had an accomplice, authorities said at a Wednesday night press conference covered by the major news and cable networks.

>> Read more trending news

Investigators said Stephen Paddock, 64, meticulously planned the worst attack in modern history, which left 59 people dead, including the gunman, and injured hundreds more at the Route 91 Festival. Investigators also said that those plans included his escape from the sniper nest he created in a suite on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino.

A security guard, who pinpointed Paddock’s room as the source of the attack, may have interrupted those plans, authorities said. 

“He was doing everything possible to see how he could escape at this point,” Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo told reporters Wednesday night, but Lombardo did not elaborate on what those plans might have been.

>> Read the latest on the Las Vegas shootings

Investigators also believe Paddock may have had an accomplice. He managed to get 10 large bags filled with what authorities believe was weapons and ammunition into the hotel and up to the room. 

“It’s troublesome that this individual was able to move this amount of gear into a hotel room unassisted. It’s troublesome for the amount of stuff he had at both residences, unassisted. There’s people that know this individual. There’s people that could help us understand this individual,” Lombardo said.

Police know very little about Paddock so far. Lombardo said even FBI profilers are stumped over him. Usually there’s a sign that a person would plan and execute a mass killing like what happened in Las Vegas Sunday, but investigators have not been able to find it. 

“What could be more beneficial than to find people that associated with him, either by friendship or an accomplice?” Lombardo said.

>>Related: Who is Stephen Paddock, the shooter killed in Las Vegas?

The FBI is confident authorities will learn more about both the attack and Paddock, too.

“We will get to the bottom of this, no matter how long it takes,” FBI Special Agent in Charge Aaron Rouse said.

Paddock may have planned for other attacks, too.

Paddock had rented rooms at the Ogden Hotel in downtown Las Vegas on Sept. 22 through Sept. 24. The reasons for doing so are unknown, Lombardo said, but it happened during the Life is Beautiful alternative music festival.

>> Related: Doctors who treated Pulse victims prepared Las Vegas hospital for mass shooting

“Was it presurveillance? We don’t know, yet,” Lombardo said

He also booked rooms in Chicago in a hotel facing the Lollapalooza music Festival in Grant Park in early August, according to USA Today.

Thousands of music fans attend the festival every year.

Las Vegas shooter booked rooms near Lollapalooza: Reports

The gunman who holed up in a room on the 32nd floor of a Las Vegas hotel on Sunday before raining bullets on revelers gathered for a country music festival across the street had booked hotel rooms near the Lollapalooza music festival two months earlier, according to multiple reports.

>> Read more trending news

Stephen Paddock, 64, turned a gun on himself on Sunday after firing hundreds of bullets into the crowd gathered for the final night of the Route 91 Harvest music festival, killing nearly 60 people and wounding hundreds.

>> Read the latest on the Las Vegas shootings 

Two months before carrying out the attack from the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Hotel, Paddock booked a pair of rooms across the street from Chicago’s Grant Park, where the Lollapalooza music festival was held from Aug. 3 to Aug. 6, TMZ reported. His rooms at the Blackstone Hotel faced the park and were booked for Aug. 1 through Aug. 6 and Aug. 3 through Aug. 6, respectively, according to TMZ.

>> Related: Who is Stephen Paddock?

The website reported that Paddock never showed up for his reservation.

An anonymous tipster alerted police to the reservations, WBBM reported.

In a statement released to the Chicago Tribune, chief police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said authorities are investigating the report.

"We are aware of the media reports and have been in communication with our federal partners," Guglielmi told the newspaper.

>> Related: What is Route 91 Harvest Festival? A look at scene before bloodshed 

Paddock checked into his room at the Mandalay Bay Hotel on Sept. 28, three days before carrying out his deadly attack, Clark County Sheriff Joseph Lombardo said.

Days before that, Lombardo said Paddock rented a room overlooking another Las Vegas music festival, Life is Beautiful. The festival ran from Sept. 22 to Sept. 24.

“Was he doing pre-surveillance?” Lombardo said at a news conference. “We don’t know yet.”

In the days after the attack, it remained unclear why Paddock carried out his attack. Authorities continue to investigate.

 

Teen threatens Las Vegas-style attack at school

A local teenager is being investigated after he posted on social media referencing an attack similar to the one in Las Vegas.

>> Read more trending news

Police say a 16-year-old Quincy High School student is under investigation for a post made on social media. 

The boy posted a story on Snapchat with the text, “You ******* better learn to walk in the halls or Quincy high is gonna turn into Las Vegas, except no one will escape.”

Quincy police say they were notified of the incident Tuesday afternoon. They were able to use social media to track down the teen, who is not being named.

Police say there is no immediate threat and the teen did not have access to guns, etc.

No charges have been filed yet, but police say charges are likely.

Doctor told wife to run while he stayed to help Las Vegas shooting victims

When shots rang out during a Las Vegas concert, a Tacoma doctor did not run. He stayed behind with panicked people in the crowd to treat their wounds.

>> Read more trending news

According to a viral Facebook post, Dr. James Sebesta was at the Route 91 Harvest festival when a gunman fired hundreds of rounds from his Mandalay Bay hotel room into the 22,000 people below him.

At least 527 people were injured, and 59 victims died -- including a Seattle woman

“When shots fired he looked at his wife and told her to get out with their friends to safety and he would meet them back at the hotel,” his sister-in-law Crystal Graham wrote. 

“He, in the midst of chaos and fearful, went out and started finding the wounded and medically helping them … He carried victims to safety. He carried bodies of those victims that didn't make it off the field," she wrote.

"He could have left with his wife. He could have escaped to safety. He made a choice to do what he knows best, be a good person. He is a hero.” 

Nearly 7,000 people have reacted to Graham's Facebook post about Sebesta staying with victims.

Graham shared the below photo with KIRO 7 News, saying that she feels lucky James and her sister, Janelle Sebesta, are safe.

According to a professional biography page for MultiCare Health System in Tacoma, Sebesta is a surgeon who specializes in bariatric surgery. He completed his residency at Madigan Army Medical Center, located on Joint Base Lewis-McChord. 

Civil Rights icon John Lewis revives gun control push after Las Vegas shooting

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Civil Rights icon John Lewis revives gun control push after Las Vegas shooting

Civil rights figurehead Rep. John Lewis, D-Georgia, re-upped the pressure on his Republican colleagues Wednesday to pass gun control legislation in the aftermath of Sunday’s mass shooting in Las Vegas.

>> Read more trending news

Lewis and several of his House Democratic colleagues held a press conference on the steps of the U.S. Capitol to honor the victims of the shooting and protest Congress’ inaction on gun control in recent years. He was joined by House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi and former Congressman Gabby Giffords, who narrowly escaped death after she was shot in the head at a constituent meet-and-greet in 2011.

“This Congress has failed the American people. As in Newtown and Aurora and Charleston and Orlando, now in Las Vegas, how many more must die? A hundred? A thousand? 10,000? A million? What is your blood price? How many more must die?” Lewis asked, according to Politico. “But there’s no number, is there? There’s no amount of blood or pain or death or suffering that would move this Congress to act. We hold moments of silence and vigil. We offer our thoughts and prayers, but it’s all a show, a placeholder until people forget.”

>> Read the latest on the Las Vegas shootings

The group called for passage of a bill that would strengthen firearm background checks. Lawmakers also want Congress to establish a bipartisan Select Committee on Gun Violence to study the issue and recommend other potential legislation.

The press conference came more than a year after Lewis and his colleagues seized the House floor for more than 24 hours to protest GOP leaders’ refusal to bring up gun control legislation in the aftermath of the deadly shootings at an Orlando night club. Lewis evoked his civil rights roots for the sit-in, which dominated social media as Democratic lawmakers streamed their protests live from the House floor.

Their effort did not work. House Speaker Paul Ryan declined to bring up for a vote anything that would tighten gun laws and raised the prospect of punishing the Democratic lawmakers for breaking the chamber’s rules.

Minds are not likely to change this time either. Lewis reportedly approached Ryan earlier this week to see if he would come to Wednesday’s press conference, Politico reported. Ryan declined.

This weekend’s shootings may have changed the fate of at least one piece of firearms-related legislation on Capitol Hill. Ryan apparently put a bill that would have eased restrictions on gun silencers on the back burner.

The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.

 

‘I realized people were dying’: Photographer who captured chaos of Las Vegas massacre describes scene

Photographer David Becker had finished shooting the final act of the Route 91 Harvest Festival and was in the media tent, filing his photos, when the first round of popping sounds began. 

“A security guy said it was just firecrackers, so I went back to work,” Becker told Time magazine on Monday.

Little did Becker, who was working the festival for Getty Images, know that he was about to witness firsthand the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history. Suspected gunman Stephen Paddock opened fire Sunday night from his suite on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino, which overlooked the festival grounds, and killed at least 59 people and wounded more than 500 more. 

Complete coverage of the deadly Las Vegas concert shooting

“The second time I heard the popping sounds, somebody said to me, ‘It was just speakers or sound equipment,’ and again, I went back into the media tent,” Becker told the Washington Post. “Then the noises went again, and that was when the crowd started to flee.”

Even as he grabbed his camera and went outside, Becker had no idea what he was seeing. Still, he began shooting photos of the crowd, some of whom were crying, ducking for cover or talking on cellphones. 

Becker stood on a table and kept taking photos, telling himself it was a speaker popping, he told both Time and the Post. He had no idea at the time that the sporadic sounds he was hearing was gunfire from automatic rifles being fired about 500 yards away.

“It was really hard to get a sense of what was happening,” Becker said, according to the Post. “At this stage, I still just thought it was a speaker popping, so I was trying to capture people’s emotions and a sense of the panic that was around me.”

He witnessed a man shielding a woman with his body. Unable to tell if the woman was injured because the lighting was so poor, Becker watched as she and the man got up and ran away. 

He saw a man in a wheelchair being helped to an exit. He saw bodies lying on the ground, but could not tell if the people were injured, or just pretending.

“I was trying to capture anything that was moving and that had good lighting,” Becker said. “That was critical. It was so dark, and there was limited lighting.”

Becker said it was only after he went back into the media tent that he learned the reality of what he was seeing. He called a colleague, who told him that police had called a “code red” and set up a perimeter around the festival grounds. 

“It was then I started looking at my photographs, and what I was seeing was just unbelievable,” Becker said. “It had been so dark outside, I couldn’t see the details. I just saw a lot of people laying on the ground, thinking they were playing possum, but now I could see people covered in blood and I thought, ‘This is real.’

“When I saw the image of the woman lying on the ground, covered in blood, that was when the impact of what I was experiencing hit. When I realized people were dying.”

Becker kept editing and filing his photographs, working solely by the light of his laptop after officials cut the power to the venue to help hide those cowering in fear. After several minutes of working, police officers arrived and escorted him to his car.

See more photos from Becker and other photographers in the galleries at the bottom of this story. 

The seasoned photographer did not stop working, however. He spent the rest of the night capturing images of law enforcement moving in and those wounded in the shooting helping one another on the streets.

Becker told the Post it is hard for him to comprehend what he saw that night. He said he continued working by using his instinct to “photograph first and ask questions later,” which he said is “second nature” for a photojournalist. 

“I was on autopilot, just doing my job capturing what was happening, which I think is important,” Becker said. “Impactful images like these tell a story, they move people to think twice about doing anything like this.”

  Photos: Deadly Las Vegas mass shooting
  Photos: How the Las Vegas gunman took aim

Ahead of Houston music festival, police discuss security, use of drones

The recent massacre at an outdoor country music festival on the Las Vegas Strip raises concerns about security for a number of large outdoor musical events, including Houston’s upcoming Day for Night Festival slated for December.

>> Read more trending news 

Omar Afra, the organizer of Day for Night, said his group will heighten its security for upcoming events.

“Given what happened ... we’ve got to have more secure points and that means not just inside the festival grounds, but again on the perimeter of the festival grounds, and that means more personnel,” Afra told KTRK-TV.

“We’ve been speaking with the Houston Police Department and our security contractors to really get an understanding of what we can do to make this the safest environment for our attendees.”

Unlike the largely outdoor Route 91 Harvest Music Festival, Day for Night will be hosted at Post HTX, also known as the historic Barbara Jordan Post Office, a “1.5 million square foot hybrid indoor-outdoor space,” according to the music festival’s official website.

The event will feature concerts by Nine Inch Nails, Justice, St. Vincent, Thom Yorke of Radiohead and Solange Knowles.

The new security measures may be a sign of things to come for outdoor festivals across the country.

For large events such as these, the debate arises as to whether or not police-controlled drone aircraft should be used to spot potential security risks. Former Houston Police Chief Charles McClelland spoke out in favor of using such drones at large events.

“I see no reason why commercial vendors are allowed to fly large drones over large crowds and outdoor events here in Houston, but the law enforcement community doesn’t use that same technology,” McClelland said, according to KTRK-TV.

Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo also spoke out about the potential uses for drones.

“When you talk about drones in this country in the hands of law enforcement, it invokes a lot of privacy issues, it invokes a lot of fear, and it invokes a lot of backlash,” Acevedo told KTRK-TV.

RELATED: CBS responds to an employee’s insensitive remark about the Las Vegas shooting victims

RELATED: Day For Night music festival announces 2017 lineup

Trump heads to Las Vegas after music festival massacre: 'It's a very sad day for me'

Andrew Harnik/AP

Trump heads to Las Vegas after music festival massacre: 'It's a very sad day for me'

President Donald Trump traveled to Las Vegas on Wednesday, three days after a gunman holed up on the 32nd floor of a hotel opened fire on thousands of people gathered for the Route 91 Harvest country music festival, killing nearly 60 people and injuring hundreds more.

>> Read more trending news

>> Read the latest on the Las Vegas shootings

 
 
Paris turns lights off at Eiffel Tower to remember victims of Vegas massacre

Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

Paris turns lights off at Eiffel Tower to remember victims of Vegas massacre

Two years ago, a landmark on the Vegas Strip went dark to honor those killed and wounded in a terrorist attack in Paris. This week, the city of lights returned the favor.

Paris Las Vegas Resort turned off the lights on its version of the Eiffel Tower in 2015. 

>> Read the latest on the Las Vegas shootings 

After the deadly massacre Sunday night, the real Eiffel Tower went dark to honor the 58 people who were killed when a gunman opened fire on the Route 91 Harvest Festival. The darkened landmark also honored two women who were killed at a Marseilles train station during a knife attackBuzzfeed reported.

>> Read more trending news 

Dramatic body-cam video shows police responding to Las Vegas shooting

Las Vegas Metropolitan Police

Dramatic body-cam video shows police responding to Las Vegas shooting

Authorities have released dramatic body camera video of officers responding to the deadly Las Vegas shooting that left 59 people dead.

>> Click here to watch the full video (WARNING: Linked footage contains graphic content and profanity. Viewer discretion advised.)

According to Las Vegas Metropolitan Police, the video "is a sampling of the body-worn camera footage from ... officers as they helped people escape the hail of gunfire coming from the Mandalay Bay Hotel on the night of October 1, 2017."

>> Read the latest on the Las Vegas shootings

>> Watch the news report here

 

Stephen Paddock wired $100K to Philippines ahead of Las Vegas shooting, reports say

Las Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock made a $100,000 wire transfer to an account in the Philippines in the days before the deadly shooting, NBCCNN and other news outlets are reporting, citing unnamed law enforcement sources.

>> Read the latest on the Las Vegas shootings

Paddock’s live-in girlfriend, Marilou Danley, reportedly has family in the Philippines and was overseas during his shooting spree. Officials said Danley had traveled to the Philippines on Sept. 15, left Sept. 22, then returned to the Philippines from Hong Kong on Sept. 25, The Associated Press reported. She returned to the U.S. late Tuesday for questioning.

>> Marilou Danley, girlfriend of Las Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock, returns to U.S.

Police have not released any motive for the shooting. Paddock's brother said that as far as he knew, the shooter had no religious or political affiliation, the Washington Post reported

>> Read more trending news

Paddock also was quite wealthy; he earned millions through real estate deals and spent most of his time gambling, his brother said. He had multiple homes, and he and Danley lived in at least three retirement communities. He had no history of mental illness.

Paddock reportedly used some of Danley’s identification when he checked into Mandalay Bay.

– The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.

 

Foster the People declines to play 'Pumped Up Kicks' after Las Vegas shooting

If you want to see Foster the People play its ubiquitous hit “Pumped Up Kicks,” you may have to make other plans.

>> On Austin360.com: ACL Fest offering refunds to fans who don’t want to attend following Vegas shootings 

The band, which will play at 6:15 p.m. this Friday and next Friday at the upcoming Austin City Limits Music Festival in Texas, said Monday at a show in Charlotte, North Carolina, that “it felt wrong” to play the song, which is about a school shooting, after the deadly shootings in Las Vegas. According to SPIN, the band covered John Lennon’s “Love” instead.

>> Watch the clip here

>> Read the latest on the Las Vegas shootings

The band did not say whether its decision to skip the song would continue into future shows.

 

Marilou Danley, girlfriend of Las Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock, returns to U.S.

The girlfriend of Las Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock has returned to the United States.

>> Read the latest on the Las Vegas shootings

>> Click here or scroll down for more

 

Las Vegas shooting: Survivor Jonathan Smith shot in neck while saving others

Jonathan Smith was in Las Vegas celebrating his brother’s 43rd birthday when a gunman shot into crowds on Sunday at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival in Las Vegas. He immediately thought to save others and was shot in the process.

The Washington Post reported that Smith’s brother, Louis Rust, is a country music fan and had attended the festival in the past. This year, Jason Aldean was headlining.

The two were there with eight other family members, including three nieces, ages 22, 18 and 17 year.

>> Read more trending news

When gunshots began, Smith, 30, told The Washington Post he thought they were fireworks, but soon after, Aldean looked at his security team and ran off stage. The music stopped and the lights went out.

Smith’s nieces were his priority, but they got separated as the crowd began to stampede. Smith started shouting, “Active shooter, active shooter, let’s go! We have to run,” grabbing people near him. Some were hiding behind a patrol car and others were standing still with fear. He told them to follow him as he walked away from the shooting and toward a row of vehicles, which they crouched behind.

Related: Las Vegas shooting: Remembering the victims

“I got a few people out of there,” Smith, who lives in Orange County, California, told The Washington Post from Sunrise Hospital & Medical Center in Las Vegas. “You could hear the shots. It sounded like it was coming from all over Las Vegas Boulevard.”

Smith was shot when he tried to get some young girls closer to proper coverage from the bullets.

“I couldn’t feel anything in my neck,” the father of three told The Washington Post. “There was a warm sensation in my arm.”

Smith said an off-duty police officer managed to flag down a truck. Smith and other injured victims were loaded into the back and taken to a hospital.

Washington Post correspondent Heather Long said that officer contacted her and said he thought Smith would die.

Smith is still here. He has a cracked rib, bruised lung and fractured collarbone. KABC reported that doctors are leaving the bullet in his neck for fear of causing more damage.

“I might have to live with this bullet for the rest of my life,” Smith said.

Despite being referred to as a hero by many, including Chelsea Clinton, Smith says he doesn’t see himself as such.

“I would want someone to do the same for me. No one deserves to lose a life coming to a country festival.”

Tiffany Jones, Smith’s sister-in-law, set up a GoFundMe page to help with Smith’s Medical expenses. It has raised more than $30,000 in less than 24 hours, surpassing its $7,000 goal.

Country guitarist changes mind after Vegas massacre, calling for gun control laws

Sara Kauss/ACM2015

Country guitarist changes mind after Vegas massacre, calling for gun control laws

Josh Abbott Band guitarist Caleb Keeter paints a terrifying picture of what it was like to be on the ground as a gunman killed 59 people and injured hundreds more at the Route 91 Harvest Festival in Las Vegas Sunday night.

Now, he says living through that attack has led him to a big change of heart when it comes to supporting the  Second Amendment’s right to “keep and bear arms.”

>> Read more trending news

Caleb started his message on Twitter saying, “I’ve been a proponent of the Second Amendment my entire life, until the events of last night. I cannot express how wrong I was.”

>> Read the latest on the Las Vegas shootings

The band’s crew carries legal firearms on their bus, but Keeter said they were “useless” in this situation.

He explained, “We couldn’t touch them for fear police might think we were part of the massacre and shoot us … One man laid waste to a city with dedicated, fearless police officers desperately trying to help, because of access to an insane amount of firepower. Enough is enough.”

Keeter went on to describe the harrowing moments during the shooting that led him change his mind about gun control.

“Writing my parents and the love of my life a goodbye last night and a living will because I felt like I wasn’t going to live through the night was enough for me to realize that this is completely and totally out of hand,” Caleb writes. “These rounds were powerful enough that my crew guys just standing in a close proximity of a victim shot by this (expletive) coward received shrapnel wounds. We need gun control RIGHT. NOW.”

Keeter continued, “My biggest regret is that I stubbornly didn’t realize it until my brothers on the road and myself were threatened by it.”

>> Related: Las Vegas shooting: Jason Aldean, other celebrities share prayers on social media

The country star said he is not going to live his life in fear. He added, “We will regroup, we’ll come back, and we’ll rock your (expletive) faces off. Bet on it.”

The band is distancing itself from Ketter’s newfound support of gun control.

Children's wrestling coach killed in Las Vegas mass shooting

Steve Marcus/AP

Children's wrestling coach killed in Las Vegas mass shooting

A Pennsylvania children’s wrestling coach who went missing in Las Vegas on Sunday night has been confirmed among those killed when a gunman opened fire on the thousands of people gathered for the Route 91 Harvest music festival.

>> Read more trending news

Bill Wolfe, of Shippensburg, and his wife, Robyn, were watching Jason Aldean perform during the last night of the festival when shots rang out from the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Hotel, killing nearly 60 people and wounding hundreds more, according to PennLive.com.

Wolfe was separated from his wife in the ensuing chaos, a fellow coach said.

>> Read the latest on the Las Vegas shootings

Officials with the Shippensburg Police Department on Tuesday morning confirmed that Wolfe was among those killed in a statement posted on Facebook:

“It is with the most of broken hearts, the families of Bill Wolfe Jr. and his wife Robyn share that Bill has been confirmed to be among the deceased as a result of the mass attack in Las Vegas. Please continue to hold our entire family as well as those affected across the nation in your unending prayers.”

Read more on PennLive.com

 
Jennifer Lopez postpones ‘All I Have’ residency shows after Las Vegas shooting

Sergi Alexander/Getty Images/Getty Images

Jennifer Lopez postpones ‘All I Have’ residency shows after Las Vegas shooting

The next three of Jennifer Lopez’s “All I Have” Las Vegas residency shows have been postponed in the aftermath of Sunday’s shooting at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival, Billboard reported.

At least 59 people were killed and more than 500 people were injured when a man shot into the crowds near Mandalay Bay Casino.

>> Read more trending news

Variety reported that performances originally scheduled for Oct. 4, 6, and 7 have been the postponed.

“Jennifer is heartbroken that such a senseless tragedy occurred,” a press release statement said. “Her thoughts and prayers are with the victims and their families.”

“(F)eeling so broken this morning,” Lopez tweeted Monday. She later tweeted a list of six blood donation centers. Those same posts were also on her Instagram page.

Fans with tickets to the three October shows will be contacted by Ticketmaster and Axis box office for exchanges for other on-sale performances of “Jennifer Lopez: All I Have” from Feb. 21 through June 9, 2018. Ticket holders will also be contacted by both groups for refunds.

'I love you': Wife texts husband after being shot in Las Vegas

A Canadian man said he was terrified when he learned late Sunday that his wife was among the more than 500 people shot Sunday when a gunman rained bullets on people gathered in Las Vegas for the Route 91 Harvest country music festival.

>> Read more trending news

Joseph Lambourne told CTV News Winnipeg that his wife, Jan Lambourne, made the trip south for the festival with her friend, Jody Ansell.

On Sunday night, while he was at work, he learned from his sister-in-law that Jan Lambourne had been shot. A short while later, he told CTV News Winnipeg, he started to get messages from his wife.

“She said, ‘I’ve been shot,’ and then she said, ‘I love you so much,’” Joseph Lambourne said in an emotional interview with the news station. “It scared the hell out of me.”

Ansell told CBC News that she was behind Jan Lambourne when a bullet struck her friend in the stomach. A short while later, Ansell felt the sting that warned her she had been shot in the arm.

"Everyone was running and stampeding like cattle, and I just had it in my head that I needed to get out of there — I needed to see my kids again,” Ansell told the news station. “I seriously didn't focus on nothing but getting out to go back to my family. That's all I had in my head is, 'I need to get home.'"

Ansell ran to try to get help from nearby motorists, she told the news station, and she and Jan Lambourne were separated.

>> Read the latest on the Las Vegas shootings 

An Army medic took Jan Lambourne to a hospital, where she was initially listed in critical condition, her husband said. She has since been upgraded to stable condition, according to CTV News Winnipeg.

Joseph Lambourne told the news station that he and his son were flying to Las Vegas on Tuesday morning.

Authorities said at least 59 people were killed and more than 525 people were injured after a gunman opened fire on the 22,000 people gathered Sunday for the last night of the Route 91 Harvest music festival in Las Vegas.

Police identified the shooter as Stephen Paddock, 64, who was found dead of a self-inflicted gunshot wound in a sniper’s nest he had created on the 32nd floor of the nearby Mandalay Bay Hotel.

Jason Aldean makes plea for unity following Las Vegas shootings

Jason Aldean made a plea for unity on his Instagram page, posting a candid, emotional message about the Las Vegas shootings.

>> Read more trending news 

Aldean, a Macon, Georgia, native, was playing the final headlining set at the Route 91 Harvest music festival on Sunday when the gunman perched in a 32nd room floor of Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino across the street sprayed the crowd with bullets.

“I truly don’t understand why a person would want to take the life of another. Something has changed in this country and in this world lately that is scary to see,” Aldean wrote.

The father of two (with a third on the way) also said, “This world is becoming the kind of place I am afraid to raise my children in,” before urging “all Americans” to “stand together as one.”

About 22,000 people attended the festival Sunday night. At least 59 have died and more than 525 were injured in the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

>> RELATED: Las Vegas shooting isn’t about concert or casino security – it’s about madness

>> RELATED: Jason Aldean, Sam Hunt, Elton John and others react to Las Vegas shooting

Gun violence in America: Mother Jones database shows when, where for every mass shooting since 1982

Mother Jones has expanded a database that documents mass shootings in the United States between 1982 and 2017.

Mass shootings refers to a shooting incident where at least four people are killed.

To put the list into context, go to the Mother Jones analysis at  Guide to Mass Shootings in America.

Some information from the analysis includes: 

  • Of the 143 guns possessed by the killers, more than three quarters were obtained legally.
  • More than half of the cases involved school or workplace shootings.
  • Thirty cases took place in locations including shopping malls, restaurants, and religious and government buildings.
  • Forty-four of the killers were white males. Only one was a woman.

Below is the list of incidents from Mother Jones.

What is a bump stock, how does it work and is it legal? 

According to law enforcement authorities Monday, the man who killed 59 concertgoers had a dozen devices that could have converted semi-automatic firearms into weapons that fire at a rate close to a fully automatic one. 

Police told The Associated Press they found 12 “bump stocks” when they searched the room of shooter Stephen Paddock. They said they are not sure Paddock used the devices in the attack on people at the Highway 91 Harvest country music festival Sunday. Paddock fired at an area some 400 yards away from his hotel room in the Mandalay Bay Hotel located on the Las Vegas Strip. 

What is a bump stock and how does it work? Here’s a look at the device.

What is a bump stock?

A bump stock replaces the weapon’s gunstock (the part of a rifle to which the barrel and firing mechanism are attached). The bump stock has a "support step" that covers the trigger opening. 

How does it work? 

The bump stock works when the shooter holds the pistol grip with one hand and the barrel of the gun with the other. The support step holds a person’s finger in place when the gun is fired. 

A spring mechanism in a bump stock causes the rifle to bounce forward with every  shot. The recoil of the gun pushes it back “bumping” the shooter’s finger causing it to continuously push on the trigger, potentially allowing the weapon to fire in a rapid sequence.

Is it legal to own?  

The Federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives have sent letters to two manufacturers of bump stocks, according to an article in Popular Mechanics, saying the device is legal partly because they “[perform] no automatic function when installed." 

While the device can make a weapon fire many rounds in a short period of time, it does not technically make a rifle an automatic weapon. To be an automatic weapon, a rifle must be able to fire continuously by having the shooter press the trigger once. 

With bump stocks, a shooter’s finger actually bumps against the trigger to fire the weapon.

How hard is it to get an automatic weapon? 

Semi-automatic weapons are relatively easy to purchase. However, the only automatic weapons legal to purchase for civilians in the United States are the ones that have been registered between 1934 and 1986. According to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives, an automatic weapon is considered a machine gun. No new machine guns can be made or sold to civilians. Automatic weapons have been heavily regulated since the National Firearms Act of 1934. 

Taking possession of such weapons requires paying a $200 federal transfer tax, filling out an application to register the weapon, submitting passport photos, getting your chief law enforcement official to sign your application, and submitting to an FBI background and fingerprint check. Those weapons are hard to come by and generally pretty expensive. You do not want to violate the Firearms Act. If you do, expect to sit in prison for 10 years as you figure out how to pay the $100,000 fine.  

A semi-automatic weapon can be converted into an automatic weapon with some devices, or by altering the gun in certain ways. It is illegal to make the gun into an automatic weapon. 

Paddock had 23 guns with him at the hotel, along with 12 bump stock devices according to the Associated Press.

The Associated Press contributed to this story. 

Sources: The NRA; smartgunlaws.org; The FBI; The Wall Street Journal; assaultweapons.infoWiredPopular Mechanics

Veteran commandeers truck to save injured during Las Vegas shooting

A U.S. Marine Corps. veteran commandeered a truck he found Sunday while fleeing from a mass shooting at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival in Las Vegas, using the vehicle to ferry dozens of injured people to hospitals as ambulances rushed to the scene.

>> Read more trending news

Taylor Winston, 29, told CBS News that he and his girlfriend were dancing when the gunshots rang out.

“People started scattering and screaming, and that’s when we knew something real was happening,” Winston told the news network.

He and others climbed a nearby fence to get to safety, where Winston found several parked white trucks.

“(There) was a utility vehicle, and I knew that sometimes keys are left behind for the next driver,” Winston told The Orange County Register. He opened a driver’s side door to investigate and found keys waiting in the truck’s ignition.

>> Read the latest on the Las Vegas shootings

All around Winston were injured people, some being pulled to safety by others, some lying on the ground, he told the Register.

“We started grabbing people and loading them in the truck,” Winston said, telling the newspaper he was aided by a friend. “Some were in critical condition. We took a full load to the hospital and then came back for more.”

Over the course of two trips, Winston estimated that he helped about 30 people get to Desert Springs Hospital Medical Center. After returning for a third run, he told KGTV that he saw that emergency crews were in control of the scene.

Winston joined the Marines when he was 17, according to CBS News. He served two tours in Iraq and was honorably discharged in 2011 as a sergeant.

"I think a lot of my training in the military helped me in the situation,” he told CBS News. “We needed to get them out of there regardless of our safety.”

Still, Winston brushed off the “hero” title in an interview with KGTV.

“There’s a lot of unsung heroes that day that stood up and helped people,” he told the news station.

Authorities said at least 59 people were killed and more than 525 others were injured Sunday when a gunman opened fire on 22,000 people gathered for the final night of the Route 91 Harvest music festival. Officials continue to investigate the attack.

 

John Rich handed over his firearm when a police officer needed it the most in Las Vegas

Big & Rich are known for always bringing the party, and they did just that as they performed on the same night as artists such as Jason Aldean, Jake Owen and Kane Brown at the Route 91 Harvest Festival in Las Vegas on Oct. 1.

And then the party ended when a shooter opened fire on the crowd.

And Big & Rich will never be the same.

RELATED: A country music singer hid under a car during Vegas shooting

“We played 90 minutes to two hours before Jason Aldean,” John Rich told Fox News about the tragic events that occurred late that night. “We loaded up our bus, and there is a little country bar I have in Las Vegas that I own [Redneck Riviera], and we went over there to play a little after-show set. We were onstage there and got the tap on the shoulder that there was an active shooter. We immediately stopped playing and got everyone away from the windows and tried to secure the location.”

>> Read the latest on the Las Vegas shootings 

Standing in that crowd at the bar that evening was a Minneapolis police officer, who was on hand just to enjoy a little live music. For one of the first times, he did not have his weapon on him. So he walked up to John and asked him a scary question.

RELATED: A much-loved country music family recounts their horrific night in Vegas

“He came up to me and showed me his badge and he says, ‘I’m an officer and I am not armed’ and asked me, ‘Are you armed?’” John recalled. “I said, ‘Yes sir, I am. I am armed.’ I have my concealed weapon permit. And he said, ‘Can I have your firearm so I can hold point on the front door?’ So I handed over my firearm to him. Everyone got behind him and, for about two hours without flinching, this guy kept point on that front door just in case someone came through.”

>> Read more trending news 

Late-night hosts honor victims of Las Vegas massacre

Jimmy Fallon took a moment to remember the victims of of Sunday’s Las Vegas massacre on Monday’s “The Tonight Show.” 

>> Read more trending news 

In his monologue, Fallon said, “In the face of tragedies and acts of terror we need to remember that good still exists in the world. We’re here to entertain you tonight and that’s what we’re going to do.”

>> Read the latest on the Las Vegas shootings 

He then introduced Miley Cyrus and Adam Sandler as they performed Dido’s “No Freedom.” The unusual duo had Cyrus on lead vocals and Sandler singing backup and accompanying her on guitar, Mashable reported.

>>Las Vegas shooting: Remembering the victims

Watch the performance below, or click here.

Meanwhile, Jimmy Kimmel broke down as he introduced his show and spoke about the deadly shooting during the Route 91 Harvest Festival, The New York Post reported.

Kimmel, who is from Las Vegas, said “Here we are again, in the aftermath of another terrible, inexplicably shocking and painful tragedy.”

He then went through the background of some of the victims.

“We lost two police officers, we lost a nurse from Tennessee, a special ed teacher from a local school here in Manhattan Beach. All these devastated families who now have to live with this pain forever because one person with a violent and insane voice in his head managed to stockpile a collection of high-powered rifles. And used them to shoot people,” Kimmel said.

“Of course, there was something we can do about it. There are a lot of things we can do about it. But we don’t. Which is interesting, because when someone with a beard attacks us, we tap phones, we invoke travel bans, we build walls. We take every possible precaution to make sure it doesn’t happen again. But when an American buys a gun and kills other Americans then there’s nothing we can do about that because the Second Amendment. Our forefathers wanted us to have AK47s, is the argument.”

Watch his monologue below, or click here

Warning, the clip contains profanity.

 

There are some problems with ISIS claiming responsibility for the Las Vegas shooting

American officials are combating ISIS’ claim that Stephen Paddock, the man believed to be the gunman behind the deadliest shooting in modern American history, acted on behalf of the terror group.

>> Watch the news report here

Time reported that the terror group released a statement taking responsibility for Paddock’s alleged actions, which killed at least 59 and injured more than 500. The group also said Paddock converted to Islam in recent months. But further investigation into the claim indicates that the terror group may be stretching the truth.

>> Las Vegas shooting: At least 59 dead, live updates

“As this event unfolds we have determined at this point there is no connection to an international terrorist group,” explained FBI Las Vegas Special Agent in Charge Aaron Rouse on Monday. “As the investigation continues we will continue to work with our partners to ensure this is factually and thoroughly investigated to be able to bring comfort and peace to this community.”

>> PHOTOS: Deadly Las Vegas mass shooting

>> Read the latest on the Las Vegas shootings

If Paddock was a part of a group of any kind, it’s news to those closest to himCBS News reported that Paddock’s brother, Eric Paddock, told reporters, “No religious affiliation. No political affiliation. He just hung out.”

>> Read more trending news

Though a connection between the shooting and Islamic terror has yet to be confirmed, this has not stopped hoaxes about the shooter’s motivations from circulating.

>> On Rare.us: Las Vegas shooting is now the deadliest in American history

 

Josh Abbott Band's Caleb Keeter changes gun control stance after Las Vegas shooting

Josh Abbott Band lead guitarist Caleb Keeter has tweeted in favor of stricter gun control laws after his evacuation from the Route 91 Harvest country music festival in Las Vegas late Sunday night.

>> Las Vegas shooting: Live updates

“I’ve been a proponent of the 2nd amendment my entire life,” the posted note within the tweet starts. “Until the events of last night, I cannot express how wrong I was.”

>> Click here to read Keeter’s full remarks

>> PHOTOS: Deadly Las Vegas mass shooting

Abbott tweeted asking for prayers before he was evacuated during the shooting.

>> Read the latest on the Las Vegas shootings

>> Las Vegas shooting: Jason Aldean, other celebrities share thoughts, prayers

According to Abbott’s tweets, he was evacuated from the Mandalay Bay resort, from where police say suspected gunman Stephen Paddock opened fire, killing at least 59 people. That would make it the deadliest mass shooting in modern American history, The Associated Press reports

>> Who was Stephen Paddock, the shooter killed in Las Vegas?

Abbott said in his second tweet that his fiancée was still in a room at the hotel but was safe. 

>> Read more trending news

Abbott played the festival earlier in the day Sunday. Jason Aldean, who was on stage at the time of the shooting, was the closing act. 

 
Mariah Carey learns of the Las Vegas mass shooting live on ‘Good Morning Britain’

Mat Hayward/Getty Images for Sugar Factory American Brasserie/Getty Images for Sugar Factory A

Mariah Carey learns of the Las Vegas mass shooting live on ‘Good Morning Britain’

Mariah Carey gave a live interview Monday morning on “Good Morning Britain” when she was apparently unaware of the breaking news about the shooting in Las Vegas.

Carey was on the program from her Los Angeles home to discuss her upcoming Christmas shows in London and Paris. She was stretched out across a chaise lounge chair in a red gown as hosts Piers Morgan and Susanna Reid asked her for her reaction to the attack.

>> Read more trending news

The pop diva asked the hosts if police had caught the shooter and offered her condolences.

“Wow, that’s awful. I just hope -- again, I pray for the victims and I hope all this can stop as soon as possible,” she said. “You know I have spent a lot of time in Vegas, and this type of thing happening anywhere is a huge tragedy, so I just -- I continue to pray for the victims and hope we have an end to this as soon as possible.”

“It’s terrible, because people just going out to listen to music. Really they’re out for the night, and something shocking like this happens and no one could expect it and it’s just wrong. I really don’t know what to say,” Carey continued.

Related: Las Vegas shooting: At least 50 dead, live updates

The combination of Carey being interviewed just as the devastating news was breaking and the Christmas decor, arranged due to the planned topic, threw some viewers for a loop.

The Daily Mail collected reactions from Twitter users, one of whom wrote: “Good morning Britain talking live about the shooting in Las Vegas and Mariah Carey’s there lay on the sofa like she’s posing for a photo shoot, is she for real?”

Mark Worgan wrote: “Surreal scenes on Good Morning Britain as Piers Morgan crosses over to get Mariah Carey’s take on events Las Vegas.”

A Twitter user named Lauren wrote: “Seriously @GMB That was utterly bizarre having Mariah Carey on just now.”

Related: Las Vegas shooting: Jason Aldean, other celebrities share prayers on social media

Billboard reported that Carey fans said Morgan’s questions were “tasteless” and that Carey should have been briefed on the incident before the interview.

Morgan responded to criticism of the interview on Twitter.

“Mariah was booked to do an interview about her UK Christmas tour. Obviously news events in Vegas have now taken precedence,” he tweeted.

Morgan said Mariah’s team was informed of the shooting before the interview. He did not say whether or not Mariah herself was briefed.

“Her reaction seemed very relevant given she's a performer who often has residence in Vegas,” he wrote.

FBI called father of Las Vegas gunman a 'psychopath'

The father of the Las Vegas gunman who killed at least 58 people was referred to as a psychopath and was placed on a list of the 10 most wanted criminals by the FBI after he escaped from a federal prison in Texas on New Year’s Eve 1968.

Known as “Chrome Dome” for his habit of shaving his head, Benjamin Hoskins Paddock was arrested in Springfield, Oregon, in September 1978.

>> Read more trending news

Paddock was serving a 20-year sentence for robbing a bank in Phoenix when he escaped from prison.

“Since he has utilized firearms in previous crimes, has employed violence in attempting to evade arrest and has been diagnosed as being psychopathic, (Benjamin) Paddock should be considered extremely dangerous,” Palmer M. Baken Jr., agent in charge of the Phoenix FBI office, said at the time, according to news reports.

Paddock remained on the list of the 10 most wanted criminals until 1977, a year before he was arrested. He was arrested the following year while he was reportedly working in Eugene, Oregon, as the manager of a bingo parlor and living under the name Bruce Werner Ericksen.

Paddock is believed to have died in 1998.

  Photos: Deadly Las Vegas mass shooting
  Mandalay Bay shooting is the deadliest mass shooting in modern American history
  Las Vegas shooting: At least 59 dead, live updates
  Las Vegas gunman once owned home in Florida

Las Vegas shooting: Remembering the victims

Nearly 60 people were killed on Oct. 1 when a gunman opened fire on a group gathered in Las Vegas for the Route 91 Harvest music festival in what is believed to be the deadliest shooting in modern US history.

Hundreds more were injured.

>> Read more trending news 

The gunman, identified by police as Stephen Craig Paddock, 64, was found in a hotel room on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Hotel, where authorities said he carried out his attack on the 22,000 strangers below.

He died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound, police said.

>> Related: Photos: Deadly Las Vegas mass shooting

The Clark County Coroner's Office on Friday released the names of all 36 women and 22 men who were killed in the attack.

Here’s what we know about those who lost their life that night:

GoFundMe started to help victims of Las Vegas massacre

Yamina Chavez/AP

GoFundMe started to help victims of Las Vegas massacre

A Las Vegas politician has started what is being considered the official fundraiser for victims of the Sunday night’s deadly shooting at the Route 91 Harvest.

Steve Sisolak, a Clark County commissioner, started a GoFundMe to help victims and family members of the massacre.

>> Read more trending news

Sisolak is the chairman of the Board of County Commissioners and is currently running for the governor of Nevada.

>>Las Vegas shooting: Live updates

He started the online fundraiser with a $10,000 personal contribution, KLAS reported.

Since being created Monday morning, the fund has raised more than $674,000 of its $1 million goal, with many individual, anonymous pledges in the thousands of dollars each.

>>Photos: Deadly Las Vegas mass shooting 

The original goal had been set at $500,000, but surpassed that within hours of the fund being set up.

Sheriff Joseph Lombardo is asking those willing to do something, to donate to the fundraiser page, KTNV reported.

 

These are the oldest mass shooters in modern U.S. history

Las Vegas authorities have named 64-year-old Stephen Paddock as the shooter in the deadliest rampage in U.S. history. While most mass shooters have been ages 20-50, at least three others were in their 60s.

>> Read more trending news

William D. Baker, 66: The former Navistar International worker armed himself with an AK-47 assault rifle and other weapons and went to the company’s Chicago-area plant, where he killed four workers and wounded four others in 2001 before he committed suicide. He was heading to federal prison after being caught stealing from the company.

Kurt Meyers, 64: In 2013, Myers set fire to his home and then, armed with a shotgun, went to a barbershop in the upstate New York village of Mohawk Valley, and opened fire, shooting two people and wounding two others. He then drove to a carwash and killed two more people. After the shootings, he fled but was later killed as he fired on police. His motive was unknown.

Carl Drega, 62: In 1997, Drega armed himself with a semiautomatic weapon and killed four people in Colebrook, New Hampshire. The dead included two state troopers, a judge, and a newspaper editor. Other police officers were wounded before Drega was killed in a gunfight. He had a history of grievances over zoning and code enforcement.

Deadly Las Vegas massacre, by the numbers: How many killed, injured, more

Thousands of country music fans in town for the Route 91 Harvest festival in Las Vegas ran for cover as a gunman opened fire from the Mandalay Bay Resort Casino Sunday night.

» RELATED: Las Vegas shooting: Live updates

More than 50 died and at least 500 were injured, making the Las Vegas massacre the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

>> Read more trending news 

Officials have identified 64-year-old Stephen Paddock of Mesquite, Nevada, as the gunman responsible.

» RELATED: Who is Stephen Paddock, the shooter killed in Las Vegas?

According to The Associated Press, Paddock was found dead when SWAT officers used explosives to storm into his room at the Mandalay Bay hotel. Authorities said he had killed himself.

The Las Vegas massacre, by the numbers

200-300: Approximate number of bullets heard, according to witnesses

10-15 minutes: Approximate time gunfire went on, according to witnesses

22,000: Approximate number of concert attendees at Route 91 Sunday

10:08 p.m. local time: Time of shooting

64: Age of gunman Stephen Paddock

80: Approximate number of miles from Paddock’s home in Mesquite to Las Vegas

10: Number of rifles found in gunman’s room

32nd: Mandalay Bay hotel floor from which Paddock unleashed barrage of bullets

400 yards: Distance from hotel to concert stage

40,000: Approximate number of concert-goers at three-day Route 91 Harvest festival

Who is Clark County, Nevada Sheriff Joseph Lombardo?

Clark County, Nevada Sheriff Joseph Lombardo is the top law enforcement officer in Las Vegas and the head of the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department.

>> Read more trending news

Lombardo is a Republican, who was elected to office in 2014 and took over as sheriff on January 5, 2015.

He spent almost 30 years as a Las Vegas police officer in various positions and ranks before running for Clark County sheriff, according to his biography on the department’s website.

Lombardo started his law enforcement career in 1988 as a Las Vegas police officer. He was promoted to sergeant in 1996, then to lieutenant in 2001. His bio also said he became assistant sheriff in 2011.

>> Related: Las Vegas shooting: At least 58 dead, live updates

Joseph Michael Lombardo, the son of an Air Force veteran, was born in Japan on Nov. 8, 1962, before moving to Las Vegas in 1976. 

He graduated from Rancho High School and earned his B.S. in civil engineering and a master’s degree in crisis management from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. He is also a graduate of the FBI National Academy, the Las Vegas Sun reported.

Lombardo joined the U.S. Army and served in the National Guard and the Army Reserve.

Campaign information on Lombardo published in the Las Vegas Sun in 2014 said he was divorced with a 16-year-old daughter, a fianceé and a 10-year-old dog named Jasper.

>>Related: We’re dumbstruck,' brother of suspected Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock speaks out

Lombardo currently makes $161,000 a year, according to the Las Vegas Review-Journal, and plans to run for re-election next year.

Las Vegas gunman was gambler, 'trusting,' Florida neighbor says

Retired hotelier and corporate pilot Don Judy was surprised in 2013 when he went to welcome Stephen Paddock, his new neighbor at their neighborhood, in Viera on the Space Coast.

>> Read more trending news

Right away, he said, Paddock told him he was a professional gambler who traveled back and forth to Las Vegas, as well as a speculator. Handing Judy a house key, he asked him to check on his home periodically.

“That was strange because that was only our first meeting,” Judy said Monday morning.

And, he said, Paddock told him, ” ‘Listen. I’ve bought all this new stuff. Shop-Vac, ladders, tools. If you need anything, feel free to come over.’ I thought, ‘Wow. The guy’s very trusting.’ “

Judy said he never did any poking around in the home; “If I had, under the circumstances, I would admit to it.”

He said Paddock never discussed his fortunes or indicated he was in financial distress; he did tell Judy’s wife once that he’d won $20,000 on an online gambling site.

Judy, who now volunteers at the Brevard Zoo, said Paddock told him he’d bought the home for his mother, who lived in Orlando, and planned to “flip” it after he’d bought another home for her in the same neighborhood. Property records show he paid about $246,000 for the 1,773-square, foot, 2-bedroom, 2-bath home on a quarter-acre lot, and sold it in 2015 for about $235,000. It’s currently valued at $252,680.

Judy said Marilou Danley, Paddock's girlfriend, “would come to visit or come down with him.” But, Judy said, “She was very quiet. To herself.” He also said brother Eric Paddock sometimes would ride his motorcycle over from Orlando.

Judy said Paddock “never said anything about guns” and that the only time Judy saw anything close to anger was when the neighborhood management firm refused to give Paddock a permanent access pass to swap around the rental cars he’d bring in.

“He said, ‘Dang it. They won’t give me a pass.’”

Judy said that when Paddock sold the house in 2015, Judy returned his key and little was said. He said, that, because Paddock is long gone, no police were at the Sansome Circle home Monday morning; “just reporters.”

How to help the victims of the Las Vegas shooting

In the wake of the shooting in Las Vegas Sunday night, a GoFundMe account has been set up to aid the victims and the families of those who were killed. 

Clark County Commission Chairman Steve Sisolak and Sheriff Joe Lombardo created the account with a fundraising goal of $500,000. Sisolak donated the first $10,000 to the account according to a tweet on his account. Click here to visit the GoFundMe page.

You can also donate through the American Red Cross. The Southern Nevada chapter of the Red Cross accepts donations on its website, by phone at 702-369-3674 or via mail at 1771 East Flamingo Road, #206B, Las Vegas, Nevada, 89119.

In addition, officials in Las Vegas have asked for donations of blood from anyone in the area who can make it to a donation site. More than 500 people were transported to hospitals in the area following the shooting.

Photos of people lining up to donate are being posted on social media sites.

You can donate through United Blood Services. Check with the United Blood Services website for more information. Here is a link to the Nevada portal for UBS which operates throughout the United States.

You can also find a Red Cross blood drive near you using a ZIP code by going to the Red Cross website.

The United Medical Hospital (UMC) will also be hosting a blood drive at the Delta Point Building at 901 N. Rancho Lane. A time has not yet been set for the drive.

Las Vegas gunman once owned home in Florida

The man police say sprayed deadly gunfire into a country music concert in Las Vegas late Sunday owned a home on the Space Coast as recently as 2015, records show.

Stephen Paddock, 64, owned a home in Heritage Isle, a 55-plus community off Wickham Road in Viera, a neighborhood of Melbourne in Brevard County, according to real estate records.The neighborhood is about 120 miles north of West Palm Beach.

>> Read more trending news

Records show Paddock bought a two-bedroom house on a quarter-acre lot on Sansome Circle in April 2013 and sold it in May 2015. It was unclear how much time he spent in Florida while owning the property.

Paddock most recently was living in a Sun City retirement community in Mesquite, Nevada, about 80 miles northeast of Las Vegas, near the Arizona and Utah borders.

A check of online court records showed no arrests or lawsuits involving Paddock in Brevard County between 2013 and 2015.

His brother, Eric Paddock, broke down in tears talking with reporters Monday.

“There’s nothing I can say. My brother did this. It’s like he shot us," Paddock said. "I couldn’t be more dumbfounded."

What is Route 91 Harvest Festival? A look at scene before bloodshed

It was during the final performance of the Route 91 Harvest Festival that a gunman opened fire Sunday night in Las Vegas, killing more than 50 people and wounding over 400 more in the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

The festival, in its fourth year, bills itself on Facebook as “three days of country music on the Vegas strip.” Hashtags for the event included #RT91Harvest and #ThreeDayNeonSleepover.

>> Read more trending news

Beginning Friday, it boasted performances by some big names in Nashville, including Eric Church and Sam Hunt, who closed out the night Friday and Saturday, respectively. Other performers throughout the weekend included Jake Owen, Big and Rich and Maren Morris.

Headliner Jason Aldean took the main stage on the final night about 20 minutes before police say alleged gunman Stephen Paddock opened fire from the 32nd floor of the nearby Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino. The 43-story resort is owned and operated by MGM Resorts International, which also owns the Las Vegas Village and Festival Grounds.

The 15-acre entertainment, sports and festival venue, the location of the festival, can hold more than 25,000 guests.

NPR reported that last year’s festival was at capacity. Passes and VIP packages for this year’s event, which ranged in price from $210 to $750, were sold out as well, according to the festival’s website.

Concert-goers who spent the weekend at the festival had the option of bunking at the Circus Circus RV Park for $45 per night, or they could choose from more than a half-dozen hotels within two or three blocks of the venue.

The Mandalay Bay, which overlooks the festival grounds, was one of those options. Social media posts on the festival’s official Facebook page, along with posts from performers and singers, show a fun-filled weekend full of music. The Washington Post reported that a couple got engaged during one of the performances Friday evening.

One group at the festival, Brothers Osborne, took to Twitter to call that night “one for the books.”

The festival’s organizers on Saturday told fans they were “still not over” the day before.

“We can’t believe we get to do it all over again today; get ready,” an afternoon post read.

Photos and videos from the festival show a rousing time, with patrons taking advantage of the amenities offered, including water stations that not only kept people hydrated, but also kept them cool with misting fans.

Throughout the day, the festival’s page also had live footage of some of the acts taking the stages.

“Rise and shine, Las Vegas!” one post read on Sunday morning. “We hope you’re rested because we’ve got a big day ahead of us!”

Festival organizers’ final Facebook post before the shooting read, “Good friends, good music and good drinks. What more could we want?”

Performers at the festival in 2016 included Toby Keith, Brad Paisley and Luke Bryan. Previous years saw Aldean take the stage, as well as Tim McGraw, Blake Sheldon, Keith Urban, Florida Georgia Line and Miranda Lambert.

This year’s festival was organized by Live Nation and tour promoter Brian O'Connell, who NPR reported also produced the country music festivals Watershed in Washington, Faster Horses in Michigan, Lake Shake in Chicago and Farmborough in New York City.

  Las Vegas shooting: At least 59 dead, live updates
  Who is Stephen Paddock, the shooter killed in Las Vegas?
  VIDEO: Brother Of Stephen Paddock “Dumbfounded” By Las Vegas Shooting
  How to check on loved ones after deadly Las Vegas shooting

What you need to know about Marilou Danley

The woman described as the girlfriend of the Las Vegas mass shooter has been detained, and is no longer a person of interest, according to news reports.

Marilou Danley, 62, an Australian of Asian heritage, was described as the alleged shooter Stephen Paddock’s roommate.

>> Read more trending news

Police with the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department sought help from the public early Monday morning, tweeting a photo of Danley, and urging the public, “If seen please call 911!”

The shootings at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival in Las Vegas left more than 50 dead and more than 400 wounded, making it the deadliest mass shooting in modern history.

“We have located (Danley) out of the country,” Las Vegas sheriff Joseph Lombardo told a press conference this morning. “She was not with (Paddock) when he checked in to the Mandalay Bay Resort hotel. We believe her at this time not to be involved.”

Police said Paddock used Danley’s ID to check in to the hotel.

Danley’s LinkedIn profile said she was a “gambling and casino professional” who lived in Reno, Nevada. Between 2010 and 2013 she worked as a “hostess” for the Atlantis Casino Resort Spa.

’We’re dumbstruck,’ brother of suspected Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock speaks out

Eric Paddock broke down in tears to WFTV’s Nancy Alvarez when he started thinking his brother Stephen Paddock was allegedly responsible for the mass shooting in Las Vegas. 

>>WATCH: Brother of Stephen Paddock speaks to WFTV's Nancy AlvarezAt least 50 people were killed and hundreds more were injured Sunday night when a gunman opened fire on more than 22,000 people gathered near the Mandalay Bay Casino for a country music festival.

>> Read more trending news Police said the suspected gunman, identified as 64-year-old Stephen Craig Paddock, opened fire from the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Hotel on people attending the Route 91 Harvest country music festival. Authorities found him dead in his hotel room, according to the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department.“There’s nothing I can say. My brother did this. It’s like he shot us. I couldn’t be more dumbfounded,” Eric Paddock told Eyewitness News.

>>WATCH: Brother of Stephen Paddock speaks to WFTV's Nancy AlvarezEric Paddock said he last heard from his brother after Hurricane Irma. He said his brother texted to make sure his family was OK.Eric Paddock said he found out about the mass shooting when Las Vegas police called him.“I don’t understand. It doesn’t make sense,” Eric Paddock said.

>>WATCH: Brother of Stephen Paddock speaks to WFTV's Nancy Alvarez

Meanwhile, another person who claims to be the niece of Stephen Paddock posted to Facebook a short time ago.

The poster, who is identified as Nicole Paddock, says that Stephen Paddock is her uncle whom she didn’t see often. 

The woman who lives in Orlando claims that, “Sometimes I would see him in Las Vegas when I was there vising other family, but these encounters were casual and infrequent. I cannot speak to what possibility motivates someone to do something like this nor what his specific motivations may have been. He never came across as religious or political.”

 
Who is Jason Aldean, country star on stage during Las Vegas mass shooting?

Rick Diamond

Who is Jason Aldean, country star on stage during Las Vegas mass shooting?

Sunday night’s horrific mass shooting in Las Vegas seemed primed for maxium impact, coming near the conclusion of the Route 91 Harvest country music festival. The three day gathering had brought big name acts like Eric Church, Sam Hunt and Big & Rich and tens of thousands of fans to the outdoor location on the Vegas Strip.

>> Read more trending news

It all was to culminate in the final performance by country superstar Jason Aldean. The Georgia-born No. 1 artist was onstage when what’s reported to be a single shooter began firing from a location high up in the nearby Mandalay Bay Hotel. Aldean was rushed away to safety, but at least 50 people died and as many as 200 people were injured in the shooting spree.

Here’s what you need to know about Aldean, 40, the Macon megastar whom so many people had come to see:

He’s Georgia born and raised: Aldean was born in Macon and he grew up there with his mother after his parents separated when he was young. He graduated from Windsor Academy in Madon. In August 2017, Aldean returned to his hometown to perform a special benefit concert for Children’s Hospital, Navicent Health, the only dedicated pediatric facility in central Georgia.

His real name is Jason Williams. When he started out trying to make it in the country music world, Aldean said he found out, "There was an artist named Jason D. Williams performing all over Nashville at the time.” He decided to go with his middle name -- Aldine -- with a slight spelling change. It worked out just fine.

He was “discovered,” sort of, in Smyrna. After getting his first guitar from his father, Aldean started performing and writing songs with some other Georgia musicians. In 1998, he did a showcase gig at The Buckboard, a legendary and now closed country music venue in Cobb County. A representative of the Warner-Chappell song-publishing company who was there signed Aldean to a deal and he moved to Nashville that same year.

He’s taken up permanent residence at No. 1 on the charts. A two-time Academy of Country Music Entertainer of the Year, Aldean has had 17 songs hit No. 1 on the charts and has sold over 15 million albums. His seventh album, “They Don’t Know” was released a year ago and Aldean is currently touring. His next stop on his “They Don’t Know” tour is scheduled for this Friday at The Forum in Inglewood, California. 

He’s the subject of a museum exhibition right now. To many people, the Country Music Hall of Fame in Nashville is a museum, and that’s where you’ll find the current exhibition entitled “Jason Aldean: Asphalt Cowboy.” Among the items on display there, according to the AJC’s music writer Melissa Ruggieri, are a wooden rocking horse from childhood; Aldean’s first guitar, given to him by his father; a Macon high school graduation photo; a poster for his tour appearance with Trisha Yearwood in the late-‘90s; and his contract cover letter for singing with Broken Bow Records in 2004. The exhibition runs through Nov. 5. 

He’s a fan of Chipper Jones and vice versa. When the Braves great played his final game, Aldean sent out an admiring tweet to his fellow Georgia buddy. 

And the two No. 1’s have taken in at least one game together, as seen in this tweeted out photo:

Police: Marilou Danley, Stephen Paddock’s companion, not involved in Las Vegas shooting

Law enforcement authorities say Marilou Danley, a woman initially described as a “person of interest” in the shooting in Las Vegas Sunday night, is not believed to have been involved with the attack.

Sheriff Joseph Lombardo of Clark County told reporters Monday that Danley was out of the country when Stephen Paddock began shooting from the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Hotel and Casino. 

"Marilou Danley is no longer being sought out as a person of interest," the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department said. "LVMPD detectives have made contact with her and do not believe she is involved with the shooting on the strip."

Lombardo said his department has spoken with Danley. He said authorities believe Paddock used Danley’s identification during his stay at the hotel. According to one media source, Danley is believed to be Australian and was described as a roommate of girlfriend of Paddock’s. 

On Danley’s Facebook page, she describes herself as a “proud mom and grandma who lives life to the fullest”.

Las Vegas shooting: President Trump, others respond

More than 22,000 people were gathered for a music festival Sunday night near the Mandalay Bay Casino in Las Vegas when a gunman began shooting, killing dozens and injuring hundreds. 

>> Read more trending news 

>> Las Vegas shooting live updates

In the wake of the attack, celebrities, elected officials and key figures have spoken out against the tragedy and offered condolences. 

Mandalay Bay shooting is the deadliest mass shooting in modern American history

A gunman shooting from the 32nd floor of a hotel on the Las Vegas Strip has killed at least 50 people, authorities say, making the shooting the deadliest in American history. 

Stephen Paddock was killed when police stormed his room in the Mandalay Bay Hotel and Casino, but not until Paddock went on the shooting spree that has left an estimated 200 others injured, some critically. 

If the number of at least 50 dead is accurate, the shooting becomes the deadliest single-day mass shooting spree in American history.  

Here is a list of the some of the deadliest mass shootings in America.

  • Pulse nightclub - Orlando, Fla. June 12, 2016 - 49 killed, 58 injured
  • Virginia Tech - April 16, 2007 – 32 people killed
  • Sandy Hook Elementary school – Dec. 14, 2012 – 27 killed
  • Killeen, Texas – Oct. 16, 1991 – 23 killed
  • San Ysidro, Cali. – July 18, 1984 – 21 killed
  • Austin Texas – Aug. 1, 1966 – 18 killed
  • San Bernardino – Dec. 2, 2015 – 14 killed
  • Edmond, Okla. – Aug. 20 1986 – 14 killed
  • Fort Hood, Texas – Nov. 5, 2009 -- 13 killed
  • Binghamton, N.Y. – April 3, 2009 – 13 killed
  • Columbine High School – April 20, 1999 – 13 killed
  • Seattle, Wash., – Feb. 18, 1983 – 13 killed
  • Wilkes-Barre, Pa. – Sept. 25, 1982 – 13 killed
  • Camden, N.J. – Sept. 5, 1949 – 13 killed

How to check on loved ones after deadly Las Vegas shooting

UPDATE Oct. 3, 4:30 p.m. EDT:

In a news conference Tuesday afternoon, Las Vegas Police Department Sheriff Joeseph Lombardo said the original number is now back up and running for people to call for victim information and reuniting families. The number is 1 (866) 535-5654.UPDATE Oct. 2, 8:30 p.m. EDT:

Las Vegas Police Department has changed the number family members can call to report loved ones missing or to check on their family members who were in Las Vegas during Sunday night’s shooting.

Original story Oct. 2 8:11 a.m.:

With more than 50 dead and more than 200 hurt in a deadly shooting in Las Vegas, many families are awaiting word on their loved ones who were attending the Route 91 Harvest concert on the Strip.

Police identified Stephen Paddock, 64, as the man who opened fire on concertgoers Sunday. They are currently searching his home and the room at the Mandalay Bay hotel where he was holded up during the shooting, CBS News reported. Paddock is local to the Las Vegas area, living in Mesquite, Nevada.

>> Read more trending news 

Facebook is now being used as a point of contact for people in the area to check in, to tell their families that they are OK.

>>Las Vegas shooting: Live updates

A Facebook Safety Check was launched after the shooting.

Police also are telling people to call 1-866-535-5654 to check on their family members who were in Las Vegas during Sunday night’s shooting.

>>Photos: Deadly Las Vegas mass shooting

  Photos: Deadly Las Vegas mass shooting
  Who is Stephen Paddock, the shooter killed in Las Vegas?
  Las Vegas shooting: Jason Aldean, other celebrities share prayers on social media
  Mandalay Bay shooting is the deadliest mass shooting in modern American history
  Las Vegas shooting: At least 59 dead, live updates

Who is Stephen Paddock, the shooter killed in Las Vegas?

Las Vegas authorities have named Stephen Paddock of Mesquite, Nevada, as the man who shot and killed at least 50 people at an outdoor concert at the Mandalay Bay Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas Sunday night.

The shooting took place at 10:08 p.m. as a concert by country singer Jason Aldean was ending. Authorities say they have confirmed at least 50 people were killed and more than 200 injured at the event which was on the last day of the three-day Route 91 Harvest Festival - a country music event.

Here’s what we know about Paddock so far. Check back here for more updates: 

  • He was 64.
  • He was in a room on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Hotel.
  • He was taken down at the scene. Authorities say they believe he killed himself.
  • According to Las Vegas Sheriff Joseph Lombardo, law enforcement "located numerous firearms" in Paddock's hotel room. Lombardo described the weapons as “rifles.”
  • Lombardo also confirmed two vehicles that were being searched for have been located.
  • It is believed to be the deadliest shooting in US history, with the death toll surpassing the 49 killed at a nightclub in Orlando in June 2016. 
  • The Palm Beach Post is reporting that Paddock owned a home in Melbourne, Florida. He sold the 2-bedroom home located in a “55-plus” community in 2015. 
  • Police said Paddock had "at least 10 rifles" in the room. 
  • He had been staying in the room since Sept. 28. 
  • Police identified a female companion named Marilou Danley, who has been overseas and spoke to police Monday. Danley is not believed to have been involved in the shooting.
  • The FBI says the bureau had found "no connection with an international terrorist group."
  • He had no criminal record beyond a routine citation years ago. 
  • Paddock moved to Mesquite in June 2016 from Reno, Nevada. He live in Melbourne, Florida, Texas and California.
  • His father was on the FBI’s Most Wanted List in the 1970s. He was accused of robbing banks.
  • Paddock had a pilot’s license.
  • He liked high-limit video poker.
  • He was the oldest of four children.
  • He had no criminal record.
  • He sued the Cosmopolitian Hotel and Resorts in Nevada, saying he slipped and fell in some water on the floor.
  • He had 23 guns in his hotel room, including semi-automatic rifles.
  • Some of the rifles had scopes.
  • Police found 19 rifles at his home.

Las Vegas shooting: Jason Aldean, other celebrities share prayers on social media

Celebrities took to social media to share their thoughts and prayers after a deadly mass shooting erupted late Sunday during the Route 91 Harvest country music festival, headlined by Jason Aldean, in Las Vegas.

>> Who was Stephen Paddock, suspected Las Vegas shooter? 

>> How to check on loved ones after deadly Las Vegas shooting

>> PHOTOS: Deadly Las Vegas mass shooting

>> Las Vegas shooting: Live updates

>> Click here or scroll down for more

  Photos: Deadly Las Vegas mass shooting
  Who is Stephen Paddock, the shooter killed in Las Vegas?
  How to check on loved ones after deadly Las Vegas shooting
  Mandalay Bay shooting is the deadliest mass shooting in modern American history
  Las Vegas shooting: At least 59 dead, live updates

Las Vegas shooting: At least 59 dead, live updates

At least 59 people were killed and hundreds more were injured Sunday night when a gunman opened fire on more than 22,000 people gathered near the Mandalay Bay Casino for a country music festival.

Police said the suspected gunman, identified as 64-year-old Stephen Craig Paddock, opened fire from the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Hotel on people attending the Route 91 Harvest country music festival. Authorities found him dead in his hotel room, according to the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department.

Who was the shooter How to check on loved ones Celebrities share thoughts | PHOTOS

What is a mass shooting? Definitions can vary

There have been 273 mass shootings in the United States since Jan. 1, 2017.

Another one happened in Las Vegas on Sunday. The shooting there is believed to be the deadliest single-day mass shooting in U.S. History.

While there is not a specific definition of a mass shooting, an accepted one says that an incident in which at least four people are shot (injured or killed) is considered a “mass shooting.”

The FBI uses a similar definition for a “mass murder,” only the Bureau considers an incident a mass murder if three or more people are killed.

Federal statutes define "mass killing" as three or more people killed, regardless of weapons.  

Mass Shooting Tracker, a website that tracks shooting incidents across the country, defines a mass shooting as any incident in which four or more people are shot, whether injured or killed. 

By anyone’s definition, a mass shooting can be carried out by an individual or by a group.