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Paul Walker's brothers open to 'Fast' franchise return

Nearly five years after Paul Walker's death, his brothers say they're open to playing his character again in the "Fast and Furious" franchise.

Producers asked Caleb and Cody Walker to fill in for their brother and help complete "Furious 7" after he died in a fiery off-set car crash in November 2013.

His face was digitally superimposed onto his brothers' performances for scenes that Walker had not yet shot and in a modified ending in which his character Brian O'Conner drives off into the sunset.

The character remains alive in the fictional "Fast" universe and is mentioned twice in 2017's "The Fate of the Furious."

"I just hope we get to — I don't know — have a little cameo and bring Paul back to save the day and I get to help create that again," Caleb Walker, 40, said in an interview last week. "That's my dream and I hope we get to do that in one of the future movies."

"I think there could potentially be a way to do it. But it would take a lot of thought and it'd have to be tasteful. It would have to be tasteful," Cody Walker, 30, said in the interview. "He was the real deal, the real car guy. And in his absence, I — you know — I think it's lost its way in a big way."

Caleb and Cody Walker were promoting "I Am Paul Walker," a new one-hour documentary about the actor's childhood, family and career directed by Adrian Buitenhuis. It premiered last weekend on the Paramount Network.

Both Walker brothers became fathers for the first time last year and live in Southern California. They have not re-watched the full "Furious 7" film since attending the premiere in April 2015.

"It's kind of creepy sometimes when you're like, 'Oh, that's me.' It doesn't feel right," Caleb Walker said. "I think one day, when our kids are little older and we are able to share that experience with them and be like, 'Hey look, this is your uncle Paul. He was the greatest guy in the world and here we are being able to portray him and finish up this movie for him.' That's when I think it will really hit that I think it was really worth it and special and all that. But in the meantime, it's still a little conflicted."

Walker was 40 years old when the Porsche Carrera GT he was riding in spun out of control, struck three trees and burst into flames on a street in Santa Clarita, California.

The next scheduled film in the "Fast" franchise is a spin-off featuring Dwayne Johnson and Jason Statham. It's set for release next year.

FCC shuts down Alex Jones' pirate flagship radio station

The Federal Communications Commission has shut down a pirate radio station that served as the flagship outlet for conspiracy theorist Alex Jones.

The Austin American-Statesman reports the FCC also has fined the station's operators $15,000 — a fine the FCC says in a lawsuit the operators are refusing to pay.

The lawsuit filed in federal court in Austin alleges Liberty Radio operated on a channel without a license since at least 2013. The lawsuit names as defendants Walter Olenick and M. Rae Nadler-Olenick.

Court documents show the FCC had tracked the transmissions to a 50-foot tower at an Austin apartment complex owned by an entity linked to the Olenicks.

A message left with the Olenicks wasn't returned. According to a letter the FCC entered as an exhibit in its lawsuit, the Olenicks refused to pay the fine or recognize the FCC's authority, saying they would regard its agents as trespassers should they return.

According to a message on the outlet's website, Liberty Radio stopped airing in December but continues streaming online.

Jones has faced troubles in recent months, most notably a defamation lawsuit arising from his false claim on his Austin-based "Infowars" program that the parents of one of the children killed in the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre were perpetuating the massacre story as a hoax.

Most social media platforms have banned Jones from their channels for violating their prohibitions of hate speech. His program also has been removed from the music streaming services Spotify.

___

Information from: Austin American-Statesman, http://www.statesman.com

US newsrooms to Trump: We're not enemies of the people

The nation's newsrooms are pushing back against President Donald Trump with a coordinated series of newspaper editorials condemning his attacks on "fake news" and suggestion that journalists are the enemy.

The Boston Globe invited newspapers across the country to stand up for the press with editorials on Thursday, and several began appearing online a day earlier. Nearly 350 news organizations have pledged to participate, according to Marjorie Pritchard, op-ed editor at the Globe.

In St. Louis, the Post-Dispatch called journalists "the truest of patriots ." The Chicago Sun-Times said it believed most Americans know that Trump is talking nonsense. The Fayetteville, N.C. Observer said it hoped Trump would stop, "but we're not holding our breath ."

"Rather, we hope all the president's supporters will recognize what he's doing — manipulating reality to get what he wants," the North Carolina newspaper said.

Some newspapers used history lessons to state their case. The Elizabethtown Advocate in Elizabethtown, Penn., for instance, compared free press in the United States to such rights promised but not delivered in the former Soviet Union.

The New York Times added a pitch.

"If you haven't already, please subscribe to your local papers," said the Times , whose opinion section also summarized other editorials across the country. "Praise them when you think they've done a good job and criticize them when you think they could do better. We're all in this together."

That last sentiment made some journalists skittish. The Wall Street Journal, which said it was not participating, noted in a column by James Freeman that the Globe's effort ran counter to the independence that editorial boards claim to seek. Freeman wrote that Trump has the right to free speech as much as his media adversaries.

"While we agree that labeling journalists the 'enemy of the American people' and journalism 'fake news' is not only damaging to our industry but destructive to our democracy, a coordinated response from independent —dare we say 'mainstream'— news organizations feeds a narrative that we're somehow aligned against this Republican president," the Baltimore Sun wrote .

Still, the Sun supported the effort and also noted the deaths of five Capital Gazette staff members at the hands of a gunman in nearby Annapolis, Maryland.

The Radio Television Digital News Association, which represents more than 1,200 broadcasters and web sites, is also asking its members to point out that journalists are friends and neighbors doing important work holding government accountable.

"I want to make sure that it is positive," said Dan Shelley, the group's executive director. "We're shooting ourselves in the foot if we make this about attacking the president or attacking his supporters."

It remains unclear how much sway the effort will have. Newspaper editorial boards overwhelmingly opposed Trump's election in 2016. Polls show Republicans have grown more negative toward the news media in recent years: Pew Research Center said 85 percent of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents said in June 2017 that the news media has a negative effect on the country, up from 68 percent in 2010.

Still, newsrooms are trying to convince them otherwise.

"We are not the enemy," declared the Mercury News in San Jose, California.

___

Associated Press correspondents Hannah Fingerhut, Skip Foreman, Amanda Kell, Herb McCann and Juliet Williams contributed to this report.

New McCartney love song takes direct, 'raunchy' approach

The man who co-wrote "I Want to Hold Your Hand" more than a half century ago is speaking more directly these days.

Sir Paul McCartney released a new single on Wednesday called "Fuh You," where the key line — "I want to fuh you" — contains a fudged version of a common obscenity.

The 76-year-old former Beatle described it in a news release as "sort of a love song, but a raunchy love song."

The song has been made available on digital and streaming platforms, so radio airplay doesn't appear to be an issue. The song will be included in his first album of all-new material since 2013, "Egypt Station," which is due for release on September 7.

Suspect says smashing Trump's star was 'right and just act'

The man accused of smashing President Donald Trump's star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame called it a "rightful and just act."

Austin Clay pleaded not guilty to a felony vandalism charge Wednesday in Los Angeles.

Prosecutors say Clay took a pickax to Trump's star on Hollywood Boulevard on July 25. It recognizes Trump for his work on the TV reality show "The Apprentice." It has been repaired.

Clay spoke to reporters outside the courthouse Wednesday. He says he wanted to "bring about positive political change" and doesn't believe prosecutors should have brought charges against him.

Clays says he thinks the "repercussions of it were only positive."

If convicted, he could face up to three years behind bars.

Van Damme's son pleads guilty in Arizona knife incident

A son of actor Jean-Claude Van Damme has pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct for holding his roommate at knifepoint at their apartment in suburban Phoenix.

Nicholas Van Varenberg had a change of plea hearing Wednesday.

He's now scheduled to be sentenced on Oct. 3 and authorities say Van Varenberg likely will get probation.

Tempe police arrested Van Varenberg last September on suspicion of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, unlawful imprisonment, marijuana possession and possession of drug paraphernalia.

Police say Van Varenberg became upset at his unidentified roommate for answering the door, grabbed a knife and kept his roommate from leaving the apartment.

The 22-year-old Van Varenberg is the youngest son of Van Damme, known for his martial arts action films of the 1980s and 1990s.

Church helped former priest accused of abuse get Disney job

A sweeping grand jury report into child sexual abuse in Roman Catholic dioceses in Pennsylvania said church officials gave a former priest a positive reference to work at Disney World, even though they'd fielded at least one allegation about him sexually abusing a boy.

The ex-priest, Edward Ganster, left the priesthood in 1990, moved to the Orlando area and went on to work at Disney World before he died in 2014.

The report said Ganster worked at the theme park for 18 years. Ganster drove the train at the Magic Kingdom, according to an obituary in the Orlando Sentinel, which said Ganster worked there for 15 years.

Disney World did not respond to a request for information.

Ganster, who became a priest in 1971, was working at St. Joseph's Church in Easton in the late 1970s when a woman complained to a monsignor that Ganster had gotten in bed with her 13-year-old son on an overnight trip and "hurt" him, the report said. The boy also told his mother that "something happened" in the confession booth, it said.

The monsignor told her Ganster would be given counseling and Ganster was promptly reassigned, the report said.

About a decade later, Ganster was on sick leave at a Catholic mental health hospital as he sought to leave the priesthood and get married.

Ganster wrote the Diocese to say he would apply for a job at Disney World and wanted to use the Diocese as a reference, the report said.

Allentown's bishop, Thomas Welsh, wrote to Orlando's bishop that Ganster's problems were "partially sexual" and that he couldn't reassign him. A monsignor separately assured Ganster that he would get a positive reference.

"I am quite sure that the Diocese will be able to give you a positive reference in regard to the work you did during your years of service here as a priest," the monsignor wrote, according to the report.

A diocese spokesman, Matt Kerr, said he knows of no reference letter, or if one was written.

"That should not have happened," Kerr said. "It would not happen today."

More than a decade after Ganster left the priesthood, a man contacted the Allentown Diocese to report that Ganster had victimized him when he was 14 and an altar boy some two decades earlier, the report said.

Ganster fondled, groped and beat him repeatedly, once dragging him across a living room floor by his underwear and once beating him with a metal cross, the report said.

Years later, in 2015, the mother of another victim contacted the Allentown Diocese to report that Ganster abused her then 12-year-old son in 1977, the report said.

Lennon, McCartney back together? Well sort of

Lennon and McCartney have teamed up again. But it wasn’t some long-lost recording of John Lennon fronted by Paul McCartney years later. 

It was actually the sons of the two music legends.

Sean Ono Lennon and James McCartney recently spent time together and took a selfie that could, at a quick glance, be taken for an image of their two fathers from years ago.

Lennon posted the photo to Instagram this week.

>> Read more trending news 

Both are following in the footsteps of their fathers, having become musicians themselves, CNN reported.

Ono Lennon is the son of the late John Lennon and Yoko Ono. McCartney is the son of Paul McCartney and the late Linda McCartney. 

Some of the younger Lennon’s followers are hoping there is more than a photo opportunity, asking them to do a musical project together, CBS News reported.

Lennon also recently posed with a photo with the late George Harrison’s son Dhani, CBS News reported

Police: Credible bomb threat led Rascal Flatts to end Indianapolis concert early

Fans at a Rascal Flatts show Thursday were disappointed after the concert ended abruptly due to security concerns.

The Associated Press reported that the Hamilton County Sheriff’s Office said a credible bomb threat led to a quick evacuation of Ruoff Home Mortgage Music Center, a 24,000-capacity venue.

Fans tweeted about confusion about the abrupt end to the show. Some video included a musician at a piano playing a song before he quickly left the stage.

Hours later, Rascal Flatts posted a statement about the incident on Facebook Friday morning.

>> Read more trending news 

“Indianapolis - Due to a security concern at the show last night, standard procedures were quickly executed and everyone was able to safely leave the building,” the band, which includes, Joe Don Rooney, Gary LeVox, and Jay DeMarcus, said in a statement. “The safety of our fans, band and crew is always the top priority for us, so we are so thankful for everyone who jumped into action and for your understanding. We will be back soon!”

Attendee Britni Sherlock told The Indianapolis Star there was an announcement over the intercom system that said the show was over. 

“Everyone booed. We continued to wait in the pavilion, and that’s when security came up to everyone and told us to leave,” she said. “I asked what was going on and he replied, ‘We were told to evacuate the pavilion immediately.’”

The show ended before the band could come out for an encore performance.

“(Rascal Flatts) had just finished their song ‘Banjo’ and did the what-was-thought-to-be-false 'Good night' before the encore,” concertgoer Andy VonDielingen told IndyStar. “Their piano player started to play and then just stopped and left. A few minutes later lights come on and security is pulling some guy looking to be in his 20s out of the pit. ... Everyone is standing around, looking at each other and wondering what is going on.”

WRTV reported that staff with concert promoter and venue operator Live Nation informed the Sheriff’s Office of a safety issue before the end of the show. 

“Last night a safety concern presented itself during the Rascal Flatts’ concert in Noblesville,” Live Nation said in a statement Friday, according to WXIN. “Venue staff and local officials followed standard protocols to ensure the safety of guests, the artist and staff. Law enforcement agencies are investigating the matter.”

No arrests have been made related to the threat.

Cleveland DJ Recalls Chats with John Lennon, Brian Wilson

WMMS celebrates 50 years as former DJ recalls interviews with legends.

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