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Bob Dorough of 'Schoolhouse Rock' is dead at 94

A musician whose songs helped teach children on ABC's "Schoolhouse Rock" has died.

His son, Chris, says 94-year-old Bob Dorough died of natural causes Monday at his home in Mount Bethel, Pennsylvania.

According to his biography, the jazz musician "set the multiplication tables to music" as musical director for the educational cartoon series between 1973 and 1985. It was revived from 1993 to 1999.

He also wrote the song "Devil May Care," which jazz great Miles Davis recorded as an instrumental version.

Dorough was born in Arkansas and raised in Texas. He headed to New York City after graduating from the University of North Texas in 1949. He eventually settled in Pennsylvania.

A funeral is tentatively scheduled for Monday in Mount Bethel.

Watch Bruce Springsteen, Patti Smith and Michael Stipe Jam

Bruce Springsteen, Patti Smith and R.E.M.’s Michael Stipe shared a stage together last night.

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The Latest: Cosby arrives at courthouse with wife Camille

The Latest on Bill Cosby's sexual assault retrial (all times local):

8:45 a.m.

Bill Cosby has arrived for the 12th day of his sexual assault retrial, accompanied for the first time by his wife of 54 years.

The 80-year-old and his wife, Camille, didn't talk to reporters as they entered the suburban Philadelphia courthouse, where closing arguments and deliberations are expected Tuesday.

The comedian is charged with three counts of aggravated indecent assault.

The charges stem from Andrea Constand's allegations that he drugged and molested her at his suburban Philadelphia mansion in January 2004.

Cosby's lawyers devoted part of their case to travel records they say prove he couldn't have been there when she says the alleged assault happened.

They argue that any encounter there with Constand would have happened earlier, outside the statute of limitations.

The Associated Press doesn't typically identify people who say they're victims of sexual assault unless they grant permission, which Constand has done.

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12:10 a.m.

Bill Cosby's sexual assault retrial will soon be in the hands of a jury.

Closing arguments and deliberations are set for Tuesday. The defense rested Monday after Cosby said he wouldn't testify.

The comedian is charged with three counts of aggravated indecent assault.

The charges stem from Andrea Constand's allegations that he drugged and molested her at his suburban Philadelphia mansion in January 2004.

Cosby's lawyers devoted part of their case to travel records they say prove he couldn't have been there when she says the alleged assault happened.

They argue that any encounter there with Constand would have happened earlier, outside the statute of limitations.

The Associated Press doesn't typically identify people who say they're victims of sexual assault unless they grant permission, which Constand has done.

Royal baby: Prince Charles welcomes new grandson

Prince Charles said Tuesday it is a "great joy" to be a grandfather once again with the birth of a third child for the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.

The duchess gave birth to the 8-pound, 7-ounce (3.8 kilogram) boy Monday morning at St. Mary's Hospital in London. The new prince is a younger brother to 4-year-old Prince George and Princess Charlotte, who turns 3 next week.

Charles said in a statement that "it is a great joy to have another grandchild, the only trouble is I don't know how I am going to keep up with them."

As the new family of five spent time at home at Kensington Palace, the birth was marked Tuesday by bell ringing at Westminster Abbey and gun salutes in Hyde Park and at the Tower of London.

The new baby is a sixth great-grandchild for Queen Elizabeth II and is fifth in line to the throne after Charles, father Prince William and his two older siblings.

William and Kate have not yet disclosed the name of the infant prince. Bookmakers say Arthur is the favorite in betting, followed by James and Albert.

Neil Young and Crazy Horse Announce Return to Stage

Neil Young will reunite with Crazy Horse for the first time in four years when they perform two unrehearsed shows.

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Kym Johnson and Robert Herjavec welcome twins

Kym Johnson and Robert Herjavec have something to dance about.

The former "Dancing with the Stars" partners have welcomed twins into the world.

Johnson posted on Instagram that their "little angels" were born on Monday morning. The 41-year-old says she never thought her heart could feel so full.

The couple had previously announced they were expecting a boy and a girl. They did not reveal their names.

Herjavec is the father of three children from a previous marriage. The 55-year-old businessman appears on "Shark Tank."

From 'Jumanji' to Tarantino, Sony teases varied slate

Sony Pictures Entertainment Chairman Tom Rothman assured theater owners Monday that his studio is dedicated to appealing to a range of audiences — from global franchises such as "Spider-Man" and "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo" series to family films, action pics, comedies and even Quentin Tarantino's Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt film "Once Upon a Time in Hollywood."

Both Tarantino and DiCaprio surprised the audience of exhibitors with their appearance at Caesar's Palace in Las Vegas, but unlike most of the films Sony would hype Monday with new footage and celebrities, they had nothing to show. They haven't shot a frame yet.

"It's hard to speak about a film that we haven't done yet," DiCaprio said on stage.

The "hush-hush" film will take place in Hollywood in 1969 at the "height of the counter-culture explosion," the famed director said.

"This is probably the closest to 'Pulp Fiction' that I've done," Tarantino said, of the kind of Los Angeles film he hopes to make. He said Pitt and DiCaprio together will be "the most exciting star dynamic duo since Robert Redford and Paul Newman."

Tarantino also took the opportunity to remind the theater owners at the convention, that he too is an exhibitor — he owns the historic New Beverly Cinema in Los Angeles.

The studio also rolled out intense new footage from "Venom," which Tom Hardy said he wanted to do for his son, and "The Girl in the Spider's Web," with "The Crown" star Claire Foy in the role of Lisbeth Salander who, Rothman said, makes "Wonder Woman look like a Powerpuff Girl."

"The thing I think makes this special and truly, truly compelling is that you can't describe her," Foy said.

Director Fede Alvarez, who was behind the horror hit "Don't Breathe," said that there is an audience demand for "good-quality filmmaking."

"I believe in movies that provoke. Movies you cannot ignore. Movies that hit the cultural conversation. I'm confident this movie will hit all fronts," Alvarez said of "The Girl in the Spider's Web."

Rothman also said that a "Jumanji" sequel, with Dwayne Johnson, will be coming in December 2019.

"Don't rush to give all those screens to 'Star Wars' again," Rothman said.

The Johnson-led reboot, "Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle" became a massive hit in the early part of the year, making over $956 million worldwide.

The CinemaCon convention features massive presentations from each of the major studios, in addition to a few of the smaller ones, like Amazon, with sizzle reels and stars to wow the theater owners with what's coming up and why theaters should be excited about the fresh movies on the horizon.

Alternating at times between a variety show and a business meeting, Sony's presentation featured everything from Will Ferrell promoting the comedy "Holmes & Watson" by singing "My Heart Will Go On" and talking about winning $50,000 playing roulette earlier in the evening, to actress Gina Rodriguez, in support of the action pic "Miss Bala," stressing the importance of the Latino movie-going audience.

"Latinos make up every one in four tickets sold," Rodriguez said. "To give them a project like this feels like such a gift, such a blessing for your audience."

According to the Motion Picture Association of America, Latinos made up 18 percent of the population in 2016, but represented 23 percent of frequent moviegoers.

Sony showed rough footage from its animated "Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse," which features the voice of Shameik Moore as Miles Morales/Spider-Man at hits theaters at Christmastime.

"I'm not the only kid who imagined himself being 'Spider-Man,'" said Moore.

And Matthew McConaughey was on hand, too, to tease the gritty period piece "White Boy Rick," in which he plays a hustler and a schemer and all-around bad, but well-meaning dad to a teenage boy who ends up becoming an undercover FBI informant.

"Wait till you see this performance," McConaughey said of the unknown actor, Richie Merritt, who plays the lead.

From studio executives, to the filmmakers behind the projects, all stressed the quality and diversity of the upcoming films.

"We're dedicated to the range of audience, including having a staunch, and increasingly rare dedication to originality," Rothman said. "We are not all superheroes all the time. But we are in the global franchise business."

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Follow AP Film Writer Lindsey Bahr on Twitter: www.twitter.com/ldbahr

Cosby jury to decide: Serial rapist or con artist's mark

Accompanied for the first time by his wife of more than 50 years, Bill Cosby walked into a courthouse Tuesday morning ahead of closing arguments in his sexual assault retrial.

Camille Cosby had been absent from the courtroom as prosecutors called a series of women to the stand who testified her husband drugged and sexually assaulted them, but she was by his side Tuesday for the trial's conclusion.

The jury that will start deliberating Cosby's fate has heard the comedian described over the past two weeks both as a "serial rapist" and a con artist's victim.

They have seen a half-dozen accusers testify that the man once revered as "America's Dad" had a sordid secret life that involved preying on women for his own sexual gratification. And they have heard from a witness who says his chief accuser talked about framing a high-profile person to score a big payday.

Now, seven men and five women who have been kept in a suburban Philadelphia hotel, away from family, friends and daily routines, will get to have their say in the first big celebrity trial of the #MeToo era.

"You now have all of the evidence," Judge Steven O'Neill told them after Cosby's lawyers rested on Monday without calling the 80-year-old comedian to the stand. "Try to relax, so that you're on your game tomorrow."

Jurors could be in for a marathon.

Before going off to deliberate, they will hear both sides rehash the case in lengthy closing arguments, and they will get O'Neill's instructions in the law.

Cosby is charged with three counts of aggravated indecent assault — all stemming from Andrea Constand's allegations that he knocked her out with three pills he called "your friends" and molested her at his suburban Philadelphia mansion in January 2004.

Each count carries a sentence of up to 10 years in prison.

Cosby has said he gave Constand 1½ tablets of the over-the-counter cold and allergy medicine Benadryl to help her relax before what he called a consensual sexual encounter.

The jury in Cosby's first trial weighed the evidence for more than 52 hours over six days without reaching a verdict.

This time, both sides have given the retrial jury much more to consider.

Prosecutors were able to call five additional accusers who testified that Cosby also drugged and violated them — including one woman who asked him through her tears, "You remember, don't you, Mr. Cosby?"

Cosby's new defense team, led by Michael Jackson lawyer Tom Mesereau, countered with a far more robust effort at stoking doubts about Constand's credibility and raising questions about whether Cosby's arrest was even legal.

The defense's star witness was a former colleague of Constand who says Constand spoke of leveling false sexual assault accusations against a high-profile person for the purpose of filing a civil suit. Constand got a civil settlement of nearly $3.4 million from Cosby.

Both juries also heard from Cosby himself — not on the witness stand, but via an explosive deposition he gave in 2005 and 2006 as part of Constand's civil suit against him. In it, Cosby acknowledged he gave the sedative quaaludes to women before sex in the 1970s.

Cosby's lawyers devoted the last two days of their case to travel records they say prove he could not have been at his suburban Philadelphia home in January 2004. They argue that any encounter there with Constand would have happened earlier, outside the statute of limitations.

Cosby's private jet records and travel itineraries produced by Cosby's lawyers do not show any flights in or out of the Philadelphia area in January 2004, but they have large gaps — a total of 17 days that month in which Cosby was not traveling, performing or taping TV appearances.

District Attorney Kevin Steele noted that the records do not account for other ways Cosby could have gotten to Philadelphia.

"You can't tell us whether he got on a commercial flight," Steele said, questioning a defense aviation expert. "You can't tell us whether he got on a train. You can't tell us whether he got in a car and drove to Philadelphia."

The Associated Press does not typically identify people who say they are victims of sexual assault unless they grant permission, which Constand has done.

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This story has been corrected to show that jury deliberations in the first trial took place over six days, not five.

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Follow Mike Sisak at https://twitter.com/mikesisak .

___

For more coverage visit https://www.apnews.com/tag/CosbyonTrial .

At Tribeca, the night belongs to Patti Smith _ and Bruce

The night belonged to Patti Smith at the Tribeca Film Festival — and to her friend Bruce Springsteen, who thrilled the crowd with a surprise visit to perform the hit they co-wrote, "Because the Night."

The occasion was Monday night's premiere of a new concert documentary about Smith, "Horses: Patti Smith and Her Band," directed by Steven Sebring. After the film, which documents the January 2016 Los Angeles concerts where Smith performed her album, "Horses," to mark its 40th anniversary, the curtain rose at Manhattan's Beacon Theater. Standing there was Smith, 71, and her band — this time in the flesh.

They performed several hits, including "Dancing Barefoot" and "Gloria." After Smith introduced her band members, she said she had one more person to introduce — and out strolled Springsteen, to the roaring of the crowd. Together, they performed "Because the Night," for which Springsteen wrote the music and chorus, and Smith the verses. Springsteen stayed around for the finale, too, a spirited rendition of Smith's "People Have the Power." On that one, they were joined another friend — former R.E.M. frontman Michael Stipe.

During the concert, Smith paid tribute to the students of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, and their fight against gun violence, calling them "the hope of this planet."

"We have to be with them — pray with them, march with them," she said, before launching into a rendition of "For What It's Worth." ''Their cause is our future.

Again at the end of the set, Smith called on "our young people to lead us."

"People, we have to make change NOW," she said.

Sebring's documentary will become available for streaming in May.

Funeral held for pro wrestling great Bruno Sammartino

Former professional wrestling champion Bruno Sammartino has been laid to rest in Pennsylvania, where he was remembered as one of the sport's good guys.

Sammartino fled the Nazis from Italy as a child and built a career beating a string of bad guys in the 1960s and 1970s. He was the World Wide Wrestling Federation champion for more than 11 years over two title runs. He was inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame in 2013.

Sammartino was buried on Monday outside Pittsburgh. Mourners, including WWE chairman Vince McMahon, remembered Sammartino's humility and work ethic, even as he ascended the wrestling ranks. The Rev. John Rushofsky called him "a man of honesty and integrity."

Sammartino died last week after a two-month hospitalization. He was 82.

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