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March for Our Lives: Emma Gonzalez stands in silence for Parkland victims, stuns crowd

Emma Gonzalez, a survivor of last month's deadly school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, has used her words to advocate for gun reform and gain a national audience. But on Saturday, her silence spoke louder.

>> Watch the moment here

>> School district arms students, teachers with rocks in case of school shooting

"Six minutes and about 20 seconds," Gonzalez said onstage at the March for Our Lives rally in Washington, D.C. "In a little over six minutes, 17 of our friends were taken from us, 15 were injured, and everyone – absolutely everyone – in the Douglas community was forever altered.

>> March for Our Lives: See what the rally looked like from outer space

"Everyone who was there understands," she continued. "Everyone who has been touched by the cold grip of gun violence understands. For us, long, tearful, chaotic hours in the scorching afternoon sun were spent not knowing. No one understood the extent of what had happened. No one could believe that there were bodies in that building waiting to be identified for over a day. No one knew that the people who were missing had stopped breathing long before any of us had even known that a code red had been called. No one could comprehend the devastating aftermath or how far this would reach or where this would go. For those who still can't comprehend because they refuse to, I'll tell you where it went: right into the ground, 6 feet deep. 

>> MLK’s 9-year-old granddaughter, Yolanda Renee King, rallies crowd at March for Our Lives

"Six minutes and 20 seconds with an AR-15, and my friend Carmen would never complain to me about piano practice. Aaron Feis would never call Kira 'Miss Sunshine.' Alex Schachter would never walk into school with his brother, Ryan. Scott Beigel would never joke around with Cameron at camp. Helena Ramsey would never hang out after school with Max. Gina Montalto would never wave to her friend Liam at lunch. Joaquin Oliver would never play basketball with Sam or Dylan. Alaina Petty would never. Cara Loughran would never. Chris Hixon would never. Luke Hoyer would never. Martin Duque Anguiano would never. Peter Wang would never. Alyssa Alhadeff would never. Jamie Guttenberg would never. Meadow Pollack would never."

>> PHOTOS: March for Our Lives

Gonzalez then fell silent as the crowd looked on. That silence lasted more than four minutes as she and the crowd tearfully paid tribute to the victims. 

>> Read more trending news 

"Since the time that I came out here, it has been 6 minutes and 20 seconds," she said after an alarm rang from the podium. "The shooter has ceased shooting and will soon abandon his rifle, blend in with the students as they escape and walk free for an hour before arrest. Fight for your lives before it's someone else's job."

March for Our Lives: See what the gun reform rally looked like from outer space

An image that shows what the crowds at Saturday's March for Our Lives rally in Washington, D.C., looked like from space is going viral.

>> See the photo here

>> School district arms students, teachers with rocks in case of school shooting

In the image, captured just before noon Saturday by the DigitalGlobe WorldView-2 satellite, protesters fill the streets of the nation's capital. The Washington Post posted the photo in a tweet shared by thousands and liked by more than 14,000 people as of Sunday morning.

>> PHOTOS: March for Our Lives

According to The Hill, nearly 800,000 people attended the D.C. rally, where gun control advocates called for action following the deadly school shooting in Parkland, Florida, last month. Protesters also organized rallies in several major cities across the country, including Atlanta, Boston and New York.

>> Read more trending news 

Read more here.

School district arms students, teachers with rocks in case of school shooting

A Pennsylvania school district is making headlines for its controversial plan for fighting back in case of a mass shooting. 

>> Watch the news report here

According to The Associated Press, each Blue Mountain School District classroom "has a 5-gallon bucket of river stones" in the closet. 

>> March for Our Lives rallies taking place across the globe

"If an armed intruder attempts to gain entrance into any of our classrooms, they will face a classroom full of students armed with rocks and they will be stoned," Superintendent David Helsel told state lawmakers last week, WNEP reported.

>> MLK’s 9-year-old granddaughter, Yolanda Renee King, rallies crowd at March for Our Lives

The district has active shooter drills as part of the ALICE program – alert, lockdown, inform, counter, evacuate. The rocks, a last resort, come in during the "counter" phase, Helsel told the AP.

>> Read more trending news 

"We have devices installed in our doors that help to secure them, to make it very difficult to break through,” Helsel told WNEP, adding that officials also "train kids and talk about barricading the doors."

Read more here or here.

WATCH: Kindergartner's hilarious 'weather report' takes internet by storm

At 6 years old, Carden Corts of Tennessee is already on his way to a career in meteorology.

>> Watch his viral video here

With a little help from his father, who’s in video production, the kindergartner at Waverly Belmont Elementary School in Nashville is going viral on YouTube for his “weather report," the Tennessean reports.

The hilarious clip, recorded for a school project, has been viewed more than 1.6 million times since it was posted Wednesday.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news 

"Today's weather report is brought to you by the letter C and also Pokémon cards," he quips before using his "weather simulator" (courtesy of a green screen and leaf blower, according to the Tennessean) to give his larger-than-life forecast.

>> Read more trending news 

Make sure to watch until the end. #SpringBreak

Read more from the Tennessean.

– The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.

Warrants issued for 100 parents over kids missing school

Warrants have been issued for more than 100 parents in Shelby County whose children are habitually absent from school.

Robo calls, emails, and more have been sent to about 107 parents with 143 children. There are active arrest warrants for these parents because of their child(s) attendance, or lack thereof, from school.

By law, parents whose kids have five days of unexcused absence from school can be found guilty of a misdemeanor crime. It is punishable by up to 11 months and 29 days in jail, along with fines of up to $2,500.

>> Read more trending news 

Shelby County School, the Shelby County District Attorney General’s Office and the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office are partnering up to help parents remedy the legal situation. They are hosting Operation Safe Serve, which gives parents a chance to resolve court-related issues without fear of arrest.

Instead of being taken into custody, the active arrest warrant will be converted into a criminal summons, unless there is another issue present. Parents will be given a court date on when to return.

“We don’t want to fill the jails. We want to fill the classrooms,” District Attorney General Amy Weirich said. “Operation Safe Serve is an opportunity for parents to help themselves while also helping their children.”

Massachusetts teacher accused of sexually assaulting 6-year-olds in dark room

A Massachusetts teacher was arrested, charged with inappropriate sexual contact with children, according to the Brewster Police Department. 

>> Read more trending news

Noah Campbell-Halley, 36, allegedly had “inappropriate sexual contact” with children, police said. Officials said parents initially told them about incidents between children and the technology teacher at Stony Brook Elementary School. 

Campbell-Halley has been a technology teacher at Brewster's Stony Brook Elementary School for five years.

Campbell-Halley was charged with two counts of rape and is accused of inappropriately touching two 6-year-old students during school in a small room off the main classroom.

"That room is what we characterize as the room in question that several of the kids describe as the dark room where the teacher, the defendant, would take these students where the touching took place,” Assistant District Attorney Ben Vaneria said.

Campbell-Halley is also being charged with one count of witness intimidation after one of the victims came forward saying Campbell-Halley threatened him if he told anyone what had happened. 

The allegations stemmed from an incident that happened during school hours, police said. 

Police said they found two additional potential victims and determined sexual contact had taken place with at least two of the alleged victims. 

The superintendent of the Nauset Public School District placed Campbell-Halley on administrative leave when he learned of the allegations. He released a statement that says, "We take matters such as these very seriously and have acted immediately to ensure the physical and emotional safety of all students."

During the investigation, Brewster police said they have learned there may be more potential victims.

"If there are other victims out there, we certainly want to hear from them," Brewster Police Chief Heath Eldredge said. "We will be available to assist those families and provide resources as necessary."

Noah Campbell-Halley is being held on a $25,000 cash bail and is due back in court on April 20.

School district cuts one day off school week; students will only go for four days a week

A three-day weekend every week! That’s what students in a Denver-area school district will get starting next year.

It was a plan that has been discussed over the past few months, but this week became a reality. The 27J school district officials have adopted a Tuesday-through-Friday week, with students in class longer each day, WTMJ reported

Elementary students will go to school from 7:50 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Middle and high school students will be in class from 8:30 a.m. to 4:32 p.m. 

But why the change?

District officials say they hope to recruit and retain teachers. Educators leave the 27J district for better pay. The district hopes that the shorter work week will keep their teachers in their district.

It will also help save $1 million a year on transportation, utilities and substitute teachers, the Denver Post reported.

The 27J district isn’t the only one in the country to adopt a shorter learning week. There are about 100 other districts in the U.S. that have longer weekends, WTMJ reported.

The district will offer child care on Mondays, from 6:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. that will cost parents $30 per child a day, the Post reported.

For more, click here.

Parents of bullies could face $500 fine if Pennsylvania bill becomes law

A Pennsylvania lawmaker has introduced legislation that could have parents footing the bill if their child bullies another kid at school.

>> Watch the news report here

It started out as a rule in Sharpsburg.

>> On WPXI.com: Parents face fines in new anti-bullying ordinance

WPXI checked with the police officer who enforces the law and he said it is working as a deterrent.

He also said it's raised awareness of how serious bullying is, and the potential consequences.

After Brentwood and Sharpsburg passed local anti-bullying ordinances that fine parents of bullies, a state lawmaker is proposing more encompassing legislation.

State Rep. Frank Burns' bill gives parents three strikes. He's from Cambria County.

>> Read more trending news 

The first time a child bullies someone, the school is required to inform his or her parents how it handled the situation. If it happens a second time, parents would have to take a class on bullying and attend a bullying resolution conference.

The third time, parents would receive a court citation and pay up to a $500 fine.

In a statement issued last week, the Democrat said bullying can lead to physical assaults and suicide.

He said holding students, parents and officials accountable "is the only way to put an end to this scourge."

The proposal also includes an anonymous bullying reporting system requiring the state education department to track bullying incidents and file monthly reports.

Sharpsburg police have yet to file any citations against parents.

– The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Alabama lawmaker says don't arm teachers since most are women 

An Alabama lawmaker is opposed to arming teachers because most of them are women and “are scared of guns,” AL.com reported.

>> Read more trending news

State Rep. Harry Shiver, R-Stockton, opposes a bill that would allow school districts to designate trained teachers and administrators to carry guns on school grounds.

“I'm not saying all (women), but in most schools, women are (the majority) of the teachers,” Shiver told AL.com on Thursday. “Some of them just don't want to (be trained to possess firearms). If they want to, then that's good. But most of them don't want to learn how to shoot like that and carry a gun.”

Shiver is a retired physical education teacher and coach. The bill is headed to the full House after getting a favorable report in committee, AL.com reported. Shiver said he likely will abstain when the bill comes to a vote.

“We don’t need to have a lady teacher in a school that’s got a firearm,” Shiver told WSFA. “I taught for 32 years, and it’s mostly ladies that’s teaching.”

Utah student writes thank you notes instead of walking out of class

When her classmates participated in the national school walkout, a Utah middle school student decided to stay in class and write thank you notes.

>> Read more trending news

Elizabeth Busdicker, a ninth-grader at South Davis Jr. High School in Bountiful, told KSTU that it was not an easy decision, but she believed she made the right choice.

“Some people walked past our classroom in the halls, kind of gave me these looks, but I just felt like I was doing the right thing standing up for what I believe in,” Busdicker said. 

Busdicker said she does not agree with everything the school walkout stands for. “It's not just about stricter gun policies; it's about being kinder in our daily lives,” she told KSTU.

Busdicker said she wanted to convey some kindness in the thank you notes she wrote, believing that bullying is the core of the issue of guns.

“We wrote 17 thank you notes to 17 different people in our lives to honor their lives,”she told KSTU said.

Busdicker sent a picture to her parents showing her decision.

“Twenty six years in the United States Air Force,” said her father, Mike Busdicker. “I did that so I could protect the freedom and rights everyone in this country enjoys. That’s why I’m proud of my daughter, because she made her decision to stand up for what she believed in even though others were doing something different.”

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