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What does '420' mean? Here are 10 things you may not know about the term

You may not realize it, but Friday is a holiday, of sorts.On April 20 – or 4/20 – marijuana advocates around the world gather to celebrate, in a variety of ways, the cannabis plant. Last year, thousands gathered in cities across the United States to consume marijuana in places where it is legal to do so, as well as places where it isn’t.

If you are not familiar with the term “420” as it is used in the marijuana culture, here’s a look at its origins and its meaning.

1. The term “420” was first associated with marijuana use in 1971.

2. It was the time of day when a group of California high school students who called themselves the “Waldos” decided to meet to hunt for a rumored abandoned stash of cannabis. The students would meet at 4:20 p.m. near a statue of Louis Pasteur on the grounds of San Rafael High School to go to search for the crop. If one of the Waldos called for a “4:20 Louis” it meant that everyone was to meet at the statue to search for the marijuana.

3. Eventually, “4:20 Louis” became just “4:20,” and the number was recognized not as a call to hunt for the abandoned cannabis, but as a code word for smoking pot.

4. The members of the band the Grateful Dead moved to the San Rafael area from San Francisco in 1970. They had connections to some of the parents of the Waldos, and eventually picked up the phrase and began using it.

5. The term spread past San Rafael with the help of the Grateful Dead and after a story about the Waldos appeared in “High Times.” Another story in the magazine suggested that 4:20 was an “accepted” hour to use cannabis.

6. April 20 is observed around the country and around the world as a time to gather together to smoke pot. In places where it is illegal to sell it, it is often given away on that day.

7. Some believe that the number 420 refers to the anniversary of the deaths of Bob Marley or Jimi Hendrix. It does not. Neither died on April 20.

8. It is not a police code for someone smoking marijuana, either.

9. Snapchat may allow users to display a 420 graphic on Friday.

10. Ben & Jerry’s Half Baked ice cream and Sour Patch Kids candy were the top two requested “munchies” delivered by goPuff in 2016. The on-demand delivery company saw an 80 percent increase in orders for food such as chips, cookies, candy and beef jerky on April 20, 2016, according to company officials. 

‘Angry badger’ forces doors to close at 500-year-old castle tunnel, tourist spot

A castle in Scotland has lasted for 500 years but the property is apparently no match for an angry badger. Yes, you’ve read that right. An angry badger shut down tourist access to a tunnel at Craignethan Castle, the BBC reported.  

>> Read more trending news 

Officials allowed the public access to the rest of the 5-century-old building but the tunnel was closed not only for people’s safety, but also for the badger’s, officials told the BBC.

The badger apparently did some damage to the masonry of the castle before it left the building either Friday night or Saturday morning on its own accord.

The animal left after castle staff members tried cat food and honey to coax it out, the Guardian reported.

Castle staff members who run the property’s Twitter account had a little online fun, posting a GIF image of dancing badgers when they announced the tunnel’s closing.

Queen Elizabeth's last corgi dog put down

The last of Queen Elizabeth’s corgis was put to sleep after a long struggle with cancer, The Daily Mail reported. The dog, Willow, was nearly 15.

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That means that for the first time since World War II, the Queen, 91, does not have a corgi in her household.

Monty Roberts told Vanity Fair she didn’t want to have any more young dogs after 2012 because she didn’t want to “leave any behind,” Time magazine reported.

Willow also was part of the Queen’s official 90th birthday portrait in 2016, Time reported. The dog died a week before Elizabeth’s 92nd birthday

Willow is one of the Pembroke Welsh corgis that Elizabeth has owned, The New York Times reported. Her first corgi, Susan, was given to her as an 18th birthday present in 1944, the Times reported. 

According to Vanity Fair, Elizabeth, then a princess, became so enamored with Susan that she sneaked the dog with her and Prince Philip on their honeymoon in 1947.

All of the corgis Elizabeth has owned since then are descendants of Susan, the Times reported. Willow was believed to be part of the 14th generation of dogs descended from Susan.

Airstrikes in Syria: Breaking down the firepower

Saturday morning, the Pentagon provided details about the military weapons that were employed in the airstrike late Friday night against Syria.

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Missiles were launched from three different areas: the eastern Mediterranean Sea, the Red Sea, and the North Arabian Gulf. Lt Gen. Kenneth McKenzie said 105 missiles were fired by the U.S.-led coalition. 

>> Trump tweets ‘Mission accomplished’

Here is a breakdown:

Eastern Mediterranean Sea: Six Tomahawk missiles were fired from the USS John Warner, and three missiles were fired from a French frigate.

Red Sea: The USS Monterey fired 30 Tomahawk missiles, while the USS Laboon launched seven Tomahawk missiles.

North Arabian Gulf: The USS Higgins fired 23 Tomahawk missiles.

From the air: Two American B-1 Lancer bombers fired 19 joint air-to-surface missile. British Tornado and Typhoon jets combined to shoot eight storm shadow missiles, while the French launched nine SCALP missiles from a combination of Mirages and Dassault Rafales jets.

>> Syrian civil war: Why are they fighting?

Russia responds to Syria airstrike, warns of 'consequences' 

Russia warned of “consequences” in the aftermath of the airstrikes launched by the United States and its allies on Syria, CNN reported Saturday.

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The U.S., United Kingdom and France launched strikes aimed at three locations in Syria -- a scientific research facility in Damascus and a production facility and storage facility in Homs, said Gen. Joseph Dunford, U.S. Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Russian President Vladimir Putin condemned the attacks as an "act of aggression against a sovereign state," CNN reported. On Twitter, the Russian embassy in the United States criticized the missile strikes, with Ambassador Anatoly Antonov tweeting that “The worst apprehensions have come true. Our warnings have been left unheard."

>> Trump announces strike on Syria

"A pre-designed scenario is being implemented," Antonov said. "Again, we are being threatened. We warned that such actions will not be left without consequences."

Syria's Foreign Ministry called the attacks a "flagrant violation of the international law," CNN reported.

The Syrian Armed Forces said in a statement Saturday that 110 missiles were fired on Syrian targets and that the country's defense systems "intercepted most of the missiles, but some hit targets including the Research Center in Barzeh."

Russia's news agency TASS reported that none of the missiles fired by the three western nations struck areas near its naval and air bases in Syria. Those bases come under the protection of Russian air defense units.

"Cuckoo's Nest,' 'Amadeus' director Milos Forman dead at 86

Director Milos Forman, who won Academy Awards for “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and “Amadeus,” died Friday in the United States after a short illness, according to the Hollywood Reporter. He was 86.

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Forman, a native of Czechoslovakia, won an Oscar for “Cuckoo’s Nest,” the 1975 film that was adapted from the 1962 novel by Ken Kesey and starred Jack Nicholson. The film won five Academy Awards, including best picture, best actor, best actress, director and adapted screenplay.

Forman picked up another Oscar for the 1984 film “Amadeus,” which won eight awards, including best picture and director.

Forman earned his final Oscar nomination for the 1996 film, “The People vs. Larry Flynt,” a drama about Hustler magazine founder Larry Flynt. In 1999, he directed “Man on the Moon,” a film about comedian Andy Kaufman.

>> PHOTOS: Notable deaths, 2018

He was born Jan Tomas Forman on Feb. 18, 1932, in Caslav, a town outside of Prague, Czechoslovakia, according to the Hollywood Reporter. His parents were killed in the Nazi concentration camp at Auschwitz, and he spent much of his youth in a boarding school for war orphans.

Forman became an American citizen in 1975, continued his success in 1979 with “Hair” and in 1981 with “Ragtime,” which was nominated for eight Oscars.

He married Martina Zborilova, his third wife, in 1999. 

What is a Tomahawk cruise missile and what does it do?

Tomahawk missiles are highly accurate weapons. The modern version was first used by the United States in the 1991 Gulf War.

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Here’s what you need to know about Tomahawk missiles:

What are they?

Tomahawk missiles are subsonic, jet engine-powered missiles. They fly low, about 100 feet off the ground.

Where are they launched from?

Tomahawks can be launched from many surfaces, but the U.S. generally uses ships or submarines to launch the missiles. 

How much do they cost?

Each missile cost $1.41 million.

Who makes them?

Raytheon Systems Company makes the Tomahawk Block IV.

How fast can they fly?

The missiles travel at 550 miles per hour.

How big are they?

The Tomahawk is a 20-foot-long missile, and weighs 2,900 pounds. It has a wingspan of eight feet,  nine inches. It carries a 1,000-pound-class warhead.

How accurate are they?

According to the Navy, they hit their target about 85 percent of the time. How do they find their target?

The missile uses a system called "Terrain Contour Matching." An altimeter along with an inertia detector direct the Tomahawk along a flight path against a pre-loaded map of the terrain. They are unlike drones as they are not guided by pilots on the ground. According to Raytheon, “The latest variant (Tomahawk Block IV) includes a two-way satellite data-link that enables the missile to be retargeted in flight to preprogrammed, alternate targets. The Block IV design was initiated as both a cost savings and a capability improvement effort.”

Is the United States the only country with cruise missiles?

No. More than 70 nations have cruise missiles.

Sources: The U.S. Navy; Popular Science; Raytheon

Two-thirds of millennials don't know what Auschwitz is, Holocaust study says

According to a study released on Holocaust Memorial Day, approximately two-thirds of American millennials do not know what Auschwitz is, The Washington Post reported. 

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As memories of World War II continue to fade, researchers at the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany found that knowledge about the 6 million Jews killed by the Nazis is also fading, particularly among adults ages 18 to 34.

Twenty-two percent of millennials said they have not heard of the Holocaust or are unsure if they have heard about it. 

The study relied on answers from 1,350 American adults in February, the Post reported. According to the study, 41 percent of the American adults and 66 percent of millennials were unable to correctly answer that Auschwitz was a concentration camp or a place where prisoners were exterminated, the Post reported.

According to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, at least 1.3 million people were deported to the camp in Poland from 1940 to 1945. More than 1.1 million people were killed, museum officials said.

Ninety-three percent of the respondents said they wanted more education about the Holocaust, the Post reported.

The poll has a margin of error of three percentage points, the newspaper reported.

Algerian military plane crash kills 257

Authorities say 257 people are dead after an Algerian military plane crashed near the Boufarik airbase, state media is reporting.

>> Read more trending news 

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